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Kato

Pelecypod identification

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Kato

Hi, I believe this is a pelecypod. It was found in an early Pennsylvanian formation sandstone hash plate. Specimen is 3" overall.

 

Would anyone have some thoughts to which superfamily, genus, etc., so I can dig a little deeper on my own?

 

Thank you, Kato

 

image.thumb.png.a7e551ba5b6fd766aee5fa686f3a517e.png

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Kato
12 minutes ago, DPS Ammonite said:

Myalina sp. oyster which is common in Texas and Arizona. See my photo of one from Arizona in the lower left:  http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/88466-arizona-pennsylvanian-perigrinations-travels/&tab=comments#comment-962578

 

DFD3E333-C7E9-49B7-8B99-4AB0CAD45674.jpeg

 

Thanks! From the shape in the pic above it seems like I could use my specimen to practice doing some fossil prep to reveal more of the shell.

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Max-fossils

Very cool specimen!

(Just fyi, 'pelecypod' is an old term used for bivalve, if you say the latter it's better ;))

 

@DPS Ammonite very interesting, and nice ID! I personally wouldn't have been able to find that so quickly. 

Here is the Myalina specimen (not the same species) I have, from Mazon Creek. A generous gift from @Nimravis

IMG_1276.thumb.JPG.62f6928e02116eeadb2d29cf1fb5f6d7.JPG

Looking at the two specimens here, there does seem to be a lot of differences between them; I guess Myalina is one of those "wastebasket taxons" where a bunch of species are dumped into (Google Images seems to confirm this too, lots of very different-looking shells). 

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Kato
34 minutes ago, Max-fossils said:

Very cool specimen!

(Just fyi, 'pelecypod' is an old term used for bivalve, if you say the latter it's better ;))

 

@DPS Ammonite very interesting, and nice ID! I personally wouldn't have been able to find that so quickly. 

Here is the Myalina specimen (not the same species) I have, from Mazon Creek. A generous gift from @Nimravis

IMG_1276.thumb.JPG.62f6928e02116eeadb2d29cf1fb5f6d7.JPG

Looking at the two specimens here, there does seem to be a lot of differences between them; I guess Myalina is one of those "wastebasket taxons" where a bunch of species are dumped into (Google Images seems to confirm this too, lots of very different-looking shells). 

Okay, I am at the head of the line when admitting I don't know much about anything and writing pelecypod let's you know that what little I learned was a long time ago.  haha.

 

The naming hierarchy would now be this?

 

Bivalve-Species-Genus

Bivalve-Myacina- ???

 

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FossilDAWG

Check out Myalinella in this paper (Figure 5 E).

 

Don

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Kato

Hi, I actually happen to have that paper in my folders! I should have thought to consult that.

 

That would have been a much easier location to find one than where I was at. At least I did not have any road noise to contend with. Just scolding desert wrens and the whoosh of raven wings flying overhead.

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Max-fossils
18 hours ago, Kato said:

The naming hierarchy would now be this?

 

Bivalve-Species-Genus

Bivalve-Myacina- ???

 

What do you mean by this? 

According to Don's paper, the binomial latin name for this one would be Myalinella aff. meeki (which is a synonym to Myalina aff. meeki). Bivalve is the name of the class. The full classification of this one would then be, according to the Linnean classification system:

Domain: Eukaryota

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Mollusca

Class: Bivalvia

Subclass: Pteriomorpha

Order: Myalinida

Family: Myalinidae

Genus: Myalinella (or Mialyna)

Species: Myalinella aff. meeki (or Myalina aff. meeki)

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Kato
5 hours ago, Max-fossils said:

What do you mean by this? 

According to Don's paper, the binomial latin name for this one would be Myalinella aff. meeki (which is a synonym to Myalina aff. meeki). Bivalve is the name of the class. The full classification of this one would then be, according to the Linnean classification system:

Domain: Eukaryota

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Mollusca

Class: Bivalvia

Subclass: Pteriomorpha

Order: Myalinida

Family: Myalinidae

Genus: Myalinella (or Mialyna)

Species: Myalinella aff. meeki (or Myalina aff. meeki)

Thanks! That's exactly what I was wanting to know. Now I can bookmark studying the Linnean classification system on inclement days.

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Max-fossils
2 minutes ago, Kato said:

Thanks! That's exactly what I was wanting to know. Now I can bookmark studying the Linnean classification system on inclement days.

Well you’re in for a tough time my friend :rofl: Let us know when you can remember all the different gastropod families by heart! ;) 

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Kato
1 minute ago, Max-fossils said:

Well you’re in for a tough time my friend :rofl: Let us know when you can remember all the different gastropod families by heart! ;) 

haha...obviously, that will never happen but it may help me to gain an understanding of the overall picture. It does seem I am coming across more and more bivalves as I've started exploring the Pennsylvanian formations. 

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Max-fossils
29 minutes ago, Kato said:

haha...obviously, that will never happen but it may help me to gain an understanding of the overall picture. It does seem I am coming across more and more bivalves as I've started exploring the Pennsylvanian formations. 

 

Studying the full classification is of course a complete waste of time. However, learning the basics (and what is bigger than what, eg ‘order’ is bigger than ‘family’) does help and that is definitely useful. 

 

I look forward to see some of your future trip reports of your finds in the Pennsylvanian, if you’re finding bivalves that’s really great! 

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Kato
23 hours ago, Max-fossils said:

 

I look forward to see some of your future trip reports of your finds in the Pennsylvanian, if you’re finding bivalves that’s really great! 

I am finding some okay stuff, but I need to classify more specimens before I write up a trip report. Definitely finding okay bivalves, cephalopods, orthocones, etc. Picked these out to bring home on a short, quick exploratory hike this morning.

 

image.thumb.png.ec0611f9b47b8d4a49584fc2621a72df.png

 

 

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FossilDAWG

If you could number the specimens in the photo, it would make it easier to offer suggestions as to the IDs.  

 

Don

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Kato
2 minutes ago, FossilDAWG said:

If you could number the specimens in the photo, it would make it easier to offer suggestions as to the IDs.  

 

Don

Hi, Don. Thanks for the suggestion and offer. Actually this was more of a pic to let Max-fossils know I've been finding a lot of variety in the lower Pennsylvanian...the subject formation of an upcoming field trip report. I think I might actually now be able to adequately name the above enough to not look too ignorant.

 

Thanks! Kato

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FossilDAWG

The New Mexico Pennsylvanian is certainly a lot of fun to poke around in.

 

Don

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Kato
7 minutes ago, FossilDAWG said:

The New Mexico Pennsylvanian is certainly a lot of fun to poke around in.

 

Don

Yeah, I've been overwhelmed by the variety in the lower Pennsylvanian. Nothing world class but just a nice variety and plenty to keep a person entertained. I have yet to explore the middle and upper Pennsylvanian formations.

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Max-fossils
16 hours ago, Kato said:

I am finding some okay stuff, but I need to classify more specimens before I write up a trip report. Definitely finding okay bivalves, cephalopods, orthocones, etc. Picked these out to bring home on a short, quick exploratory hike this morning.

 

 

Wow nice! I love that red brachiopod, looks really special! 

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Tidgy's Dad
16 hours ago, Kato said:

I am finding some okay stuff, but I need to classify more specimens before I write up a trip report. Definitely finding okay bivalves, cephalopods, orthocones, etc. Picked these out to bring home on a short, quick exploratory hike this morning.

 

 

Very nice brachiopods! :)

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Bullsnake
17 hours ago, Kato said:

I am finding some okay stuff, but I need to classify more specimens before I write up a trip report. Definitely finding okay bivalves, cephalopods, orthocones, etc. Picked these out to bring home on a short, quick exploratory hike this morning.

 

 

 

 

 

I hate to make only best guesses, but maybe this will help a little.

And of course, subject to correction.

 

Untitled.jpg.cae2a86d1ba1408d63256a28570018f8.jpg

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