Jump to content
MelbourneBeachBrent

Need help with this one...

Recommended Posts

MelbourneBeachBrent

We took the kids hunting in one of the creeks around Gainesville- found typical sharks teeth, ray barbs, etc then found this- I have no clue what it is- Any ideas?

Strange Fossil.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PaleoNoel

It's a piece of a softshell turtle shell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tidgy's Dad

Yup.

Nice find!:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MelbourneBeachBrent

Wow- thanks for the info! We were super stoked to find it- we've only been at this for a few months but never found anything that looks like this. Thanks again- much appreciated!

Brent

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PaleoNoel

:dinothumb::) Congrats on a cool find! I love finding fossils that add to the diversity of my collection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carl

For orientation, this is a part of the bottom half of the shell. Nice find!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PFOOLEY
20 minutes ago, Carl said:

...the bottom half of the shell...

Which is called the plastron.

 

Brent, you could label your piece as a xiphiplastron. :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

 

 

On ‎2‎/‎13‎/‎2019 at 12:41 PM, PFOOLEY said:

Which is called the plastron.

 

Brent, you could label your piece as a xiphiplastron. :)

 

 

Softshell turtles are unusual.  The bone that is analogous (homologous?) to the xiphiplastron is the teepee-shaped bone on the lower left in this illustration.  It is apparent that the softshell turtle part in question is not appropriately called a xiphiplastron.
EDIT:  The illustration below, it turns out, has the two skeletal elements oriented in reverse, making it likely that the original find IS a xiphiplastron.

turtle_softshell_shell.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PFOOLEY
3 hours ago, Harry Pristis said:

  ...It is apparent that the softshell turtle part in question is not appropriately called a xiphiplastron...

Well, forgive me :wacko:...I've always liked turtles and I have been trying to familiarize myself with anatomy and terminology. 

 

I saw a similar element here (figure 7)...

 

https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/index.php/download_file/view/21199/1075/

 

...so I thought I recognized it...back to the books for me. Thanks for the insight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MelbourneBeachBrent

Great info- thanks again everyone. This is such a great site with active knowledgeable users- we are very excited to be a part of this!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PFOOLEY

I stopped by the Museum today and ran into my turtle nerd friend, Asher Lichtig. I popped open this thread and asked his opinion of the specimen in question. His response was "That is a Trionchid plastral element...the xiphiplastron." @Harry Pristis, I wanted to bring this back up because I know you love learning as much as I do. :) 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jpc

I can't disagree with Asher, so I won't.  Yup, soft-shell xiphiplastron.  (One of the funniest words I know).   They vary in shape quite a bit between genera, so this one does not look like the one in Harry's photo.  

 

Good find form my perspective.  I have found lots of soft shell material, but xiphiplastron pieces are hard to come by.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

 

I concede . . . this may be a xiphiplastron, after all.  I reviewed some of A. Lichtig's papers, and it became apparent that the illustration that I was relying upon (posted above) has the carapace and the plastron reversed!  I do love learning, PF, so thank you for leading me to that new understanding.  

More than my coming to a new understanding, I hate to see mis-understanding passed along with confidence.  I will have to consider how to correct, even enhance, the otherwise useful illustration and to correct my error.

 

 

Capture_eocene_Axestemys.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PFOOLEY

Got tons of respect for ya, Harry...I'm glad we could figure this one out. And you're right, softshell turtles are unusual. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

For comparison:

 

turtle_apalone.JPG.133a17559875d075be4cfdfcc01b8563.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MelbourneBeachBrent

This forum (and its members) continues to amaze me! Just great info, follow-up, and obvious passion!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×