Jump to content

What are your favorite prehistoric books?


Recommended Posts

What are your favorite books on prehistoric topics?

Mine are "popular" books....

 

"Prehistoric Life: The Definitive Visual History of Life on Earth " by DK press- I love how logically it is laid out and how beautifully it is illustrated.

 

"The Story of Life in 25 Fossils: Tales of Intrepid Fossil Hunters and the Wonders of Evolution" by Donald R. Prothero.  This book taught me a lot about transitional fossils.

 

I am looking for other good books.  So, what are yours?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Prehistoric Life: The Definitive Visual History of Life on Earth " by DK press is a lovely book.:dinothumb:

 

If you like huge very hairy mammal this book is the ticket. 

786C0B13-D391-4028-BDE7-9180C851F4C8.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Since no one has said it yet, ... wouldn't Prehistoric Books be an oxymoron?  :headscratch::P;)

  • I found this Informative 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought this book while out antiquing today. I’m hoping it will be an interesting read. 

5CA41EBF-1DF9-4D45-AB20-60C0B0BE983B.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Since no one has said it yet, ... wouldn't Prehistoric Books be an oxymoron?  :headscratch::P;)

I thought of that but I figured I'd only get groans if I mentioned it!

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Wrangellian said:

I thought of that but I figured I'd only get groans if I mentioned it!

Eric, 

Great minds think alike. :) 

I figured I would take one for the team. :P 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Each time I browse through the pages of these two books, I always end up thinking the “Sometimes You Have To Whack It !!” thread by @Nimravis would make for an even more interesting & informative book. (I vastly prefer thumbing through the pages of a good book over scrolling online.) 

EC49DAC9-24A8-4B9C-AD47-C0AE9EC72053.jpeg

93D74F1C-83FB-45D4-BB10-89C092D1F9C2.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is my favorite. Mr. Mike is also great for helping me ID my finds on FB. 

download.jpg

  • I found this Informative 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/14/2019 at 8:41 AM, aplomado said:

What are your favorite books on prehistoric topics?

Mine are "popular" books....

 

"Prehistoric Life: The Definitive Visual History of Life on Earth " by DK press- I love how logically it is laid out and how beautifully it is illustrated.

 

"The Story of Life in 25 Fossils: Tales of Intrepid Fossil Hunters and the Wonders of Evolution" by Donald R. Prothero.  This book taught me a lot about transitional fossils.

 

I am looking for other good books.  So, what are yours?

 

Don Prothero is a good writer.  You can't go wrong with any of his books.  I really liked his "After the Dinosaurs: The Age of Mammals" (Indiana University Press, 2006).  It isn't just about Cenozoic mammals.  It's a review of the Cenozoic Era, epoch-by-epoch.  He does cover the evolution of modern mammals and the now-extinct groups but he also talks about how other groups fared across that time.  He tracks the drift of continents and how climates changed in response.  There hasn't been a book on the Cenozoic like that in recent memory.  I'm reading his book on the giant indricothere rhinos right now.

 

I like David Rains Wallace's books.  They often cover or at least touch on paleontology as he takes the reader along with him on his travels.  Somewhere in the depths of the Fossil Forum are a couple of book reviews of his books that I wrote ("Beasts of Eden" and "The Monkey's Bridge").  His "Neptune's Ark" was great too.

 

When I was a kid, I really liked Roy Chapman Andrew's books.  One of them was "All About Dinosaurs."  in the 80's, Robert Bakker's "The Dinosaur Heresies" was a great read with fun illustrations.

 

I'd have to put together another post to list more books.  Besides the essay/travelogue-type books, I like finding references on groups or faunas too even if they range into the technical side of the literature.  You can pick up at least some of the scientific terms as you read.  Yeah, the terms can be cumbersome but you also get the details you can't find in a mainstream book or magazine article.

 

 

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Jesuslover340

"Vertebrate Paleontology of Australasia" edited by P. Vickers-Rich and others, "The Greening of Gondwana" by Mary White, "Dragons in the Dust: the Paleobiology of The Giant Monitor Lizard Megalania" by Ralph Molnar, and "King of the Crocodylians" by David Schwimmer would have to be some of my favorites.

1550395045136_9867837280_31a8e146.jpg

1550395045139_4758747510_31a8e146.jpg

1550395045128_7353750085_31a8e146.jpg

1550395045133_5217101740_31a8e146.jpg

  • I found this Informative 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
The Amateur Paleontologist
14 hours ago, JarrodB said:

This is my favorite. 

download.jpg

The second edition of that book is even better :) 

-Christian

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

The second edition of that book is even better :) 

-Christian

Is it interesting for determination, Christian? 

 

Natalie

Link to post
Share on other sites
The Amateur Paleontologist
23 minutes ago, Natalie81 said:

Is it interesting for determination, Christian? 

 

Natalie

It's interesting in quite a few ways :) It has some very high-quality pictures of fossil specimens, which are pretty useful for ID (along with detailed descriptions of the fossils). The author (Mike Everhart) also includes some of his own personal experiences of collecting in the chalk, which can give some good information about how collecting is done over there. And of course, all aspects of discovering and collecting Chalk fossils in Kansas are covered in an accessible but very detailed way.

Trust me, if you want to go looking for fossils in the Kansas Chalk badlands, this book is a must :) 

-Christian

 

p.s. Here's the amazon.fr link, if you want to order the book - Oceans of Kansas, 2nd edition

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

It's interesting in quite a few ways :) It has some very high-quality pictures of fossil specimens, which are pretty useful for ID (along with detailed descriptions of the fossils). The author (Mike Everhart) also includes some of his own personal experiences of collecting in the chalk, which can give some good information about how collecting is done over there. And of course, all aspects of discovering and collecting Chalk fossils in Kansas are covered in an accessible but very detailed way.

Trust me, if you want to go looking for fossils in the Kansas Chalk badlands, this book is a must :) 

-Christian

 

p.s. Here's the amazon.fr link, if you want to order the book - Oceans of Kansas, 2nd edition

Thank you for the information, Christian! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/17/2019 at 1:51 AM, Jesuslover340 said:

"Vertebrate Paleontology of Australasia" edited by P. Vickers-Rich and others, "The Greening of Gondwana" by Mary White, "Dragons in the Dust: the Paleobiology of The Giant Monitor Lizard Megalania" by Ralph Molnar, and "King of the Crocodylians" by David Schwimmer would have to be some of my favorites.

1550395045136_9867837280_31a8e146.jpg

1550395045139_4758747510_31a8e146.jpg

1550395045128_7353750085_31a8e146.jpg

1550395045133_5217101740_31a8e146.jpg

 

Yes, those are great books though I must admit I've only leafed through the last two.  The look very thorough.

 

I acquired my copy of "Vertebrate Palaeontology of Australasia" through an Australian trading card collector I was making a deal with at the time.  I realized he lived near the university and asked him if he could get the book for me as a side deal if I sent him the money.  He did.  It's a fantastic reference with pages and pages of figures.

 

Anyone into plants or paleontology in general should pick up "The Greening of Gondwana."

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...