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Zenmaster6

Marine Fossil ID?

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Zenmaster6

I found this is Western Washington state in an Oligocene Era sediment.
I was thinking baculite but I have no idea. Someone please help me out. 

I split open a huge piece of mudstone and it popped out negative and positive (so the rock on the left is the imprint and the right is the positive). A piece broke off so I had to glue it back together

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Zenmaster6

Admins: I tried to remove this but its still here? Can anyone help remove this. I made a dupe to the correct discussion

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Kane

I moved this to fossil ID. I’ve deleted your duplicate thread. 

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ynot
45 minutes ago, Zenmaster6 said:

I found this is Western Washington state in an Oligocene Era sediment.

Kind of looks like a orthocone nautiloid, but they are much older than Oligocene.

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Zenmaster6
18 minutes ago, ynot said:

Kind of looks like a orthocone nautiloid, but they are much older than Oligocene.

I have reason to believe this sediment is from the cretaceous time period. 
but the geologic maps say Tertiary and more specifically the Oligocene. 
I'm wondering if the maps are wrong. 

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DPS Ammonite

It looks like a Razor Clam which is a common name for very elongated clams that include many different genera that go back to at least the Cretaceous. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Razor_clam

1DC65955-5C1E-4870-928E-8C0262B4FB60.jpeg

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Zenmaster6
51 minutes ago, DPS Ammonite said:

It looks like a Razor Clam which is a common name for very elongated clams that include many different genera that go back to at least the Cretaceous. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Razor_clam

1DC65955-5C1E-4870-928E-8C0262B4FB60.jpeg

Oh my gosh, I think you're 100% right. The markings on the negative. The fact that those are local in my area

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Wrangellian

Razor clam crossed my mind too, before I saw DPS's post..  Nice find! I can't say I've sever seen a razor clam fossil before.

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Zenmaster6
2 minutes ago, Wrangellian said:

Razor clam crossed my mind too, before I saw DPS's post..  Nice find! I can't say I've sever seen a razor clam fossil before.

Thanks. Unfortunately it is broken into only a segment but it is still very cool

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Al Dente

It might be Pinna or a close relative.

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Rockwood

Any chance there is a resemblance to the little tube in rock in separate post ?

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Zenmaster6
6 hours ago, Rockwood said:

Any chance there is a resemblance to the little tube in rock in separate post ?

I think its no cigar for any similarities. The tube is a perfect 360 degrees around and the clam is a very squished rectangle. Good connection though :D:dinothumb:

wfkwef.png

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Zenmaster6
7 hours ago, Al Dente said:

It might be Pinna or a close relative.

I don't think its a pinna because, in person the marking have these razor clam striations 

w.png

500.jpg

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