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kg1

Unknown Gastropod from Oregon?

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kg1

This Gastropod does not seem to be in Ellen Moore's book and there seems to be different opinions as to what it might be.  Is there anyone who can tell me exactly what this is and show me a picture of the specimen they refer to?  Miocene Astoria Formation Oregon

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fifbrindacier

You can check that site : http://fossilshells.nl.

It looks like a Buccinidae, but i'm not sure, Could you take a photo of the opening face ?

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kg1

opening face pics

20190217_112838 - Copy.jpg

20190217_112847 - Copy.jpg

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fifbrindacier

Could take those pics with your shell in a vertical position ?

Like on the left of this pic i took from the net :

5c69b93683ad9_Beringiuskennicottii1.jpg.bc42a83bdd30d1ffd148ff93934ec2ca.jpg

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Max-fossils

Very nice! 

 

(For those that didn't notice, the tags say 'Astoria Formation'. @kg1, it's generally a good idea to put that kind of info in the main text too, as people (ie me) often have the tendency to forget to look at the tags ;))

 

Here is a paper I found when googling "Astoria Formation fossils": https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0419/report.pdf I guess it's the one you were referencing. 

I personally think that Gyrineum dilleri (plate II, 8-9) looks very similar to yours. 

 

After quickly looking through the other specimens featured in the book, I must say I'm impressed! It looks like a really rich location regarding the molluscan fauna! Must be real pleasure to hunt at :) 

 

Best regards,

 

Max

 

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kg1

@Max-fossils         That  is definatley the one that most closely resembles this one but I keep thinking mine has 2 more vertices? than the one thats referred to in that publication.   It also may be named incorrectly if it is that one.   One expert says: "Just to be clear this is certainly not closely related to Gyrineum, although that is the name that Ellen and others of that time had used. The type (Gyrineum gyrineum is quite distinctive (small nodes, sharp varices, squat whorls, somewhat flattened in profile. The genus evolved in the tropical Indo-Pacific, however. Argobuccinum and related taxa (Mediargo) evolved in the north Pacific during the Paleocene. Beu (2010) suggested synonymizing with Argobuccinum on the basis of purported evolutionary relationships and morphological characters https://www.priweb.org/downloads/pubs/item_pdf_5607.pdf "

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Max-fossils

@kg1 reading the document more closely, it seems that you're correct, Gyrineum doesn't appear to be valid indeed. 

About the "vertices" (are you referring to the big ridges running along your shell from top to bottom? My gastropod terminology is not very good...), I know that these can sometimes be very variable. Especially in the Buccinidae, looking at the species Buccinum undatum, I know although most specimens don't have any, finding specimens that do have those ridges is not uncommon, and the number of ridges can vary greatly too. Although the ridges in yours seem very pronounced (I am not familiar with the genus enough to say whether this is a "must-have' characteristic or not), I think that something similar could be the case in our question here. 

So I guess it's Argobuccinum then. 

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kg1

@Max-fossils

I was referring to the smaller ones.  Also the big ridges on either side  are offset from one another quite a bit.

 

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Max-fossils
48 minutes ago, kg1 said:

@Max-fossils

I was referring to the smaller ones.  Also the big ridges on either side  are offset from one another quite a bit.

 

Then I don’t know what you’re talking about... could you point them out by labeling a picture perhaps? 

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fifbrindacier
2 hours ago, Max-fossils said:

@kg1 reading the document more closely, it seems that you're correct, Gyrineum doesn't appear to be valid indeed. 

About the "vertices" (are you referring to the big ridges running along your shell from top to bottom? My gastropod terminology is not very good...), I know that these can sometimes be very variable. Especially in the Buccinidae, looking at the species Buccinum undatum, I know although most specimens don't have any, finding specimens that do have those ridges is not uncommon, and the number of ridges can vary greatly too. Although the ridges in yours seem very pronounced (I am not familiar with the genus enough to say whether this is a "must-have' characteristic or not), I think that something similar could be the case in our question here. 

So I guess it's Argobuccinum then. 

I also wonder about those very pronounced ridges. I've looked at the documents you both posted and found on the net a photo of Argobuccinum pustulosum with big ridges.

5c69e6c6f3771_Argobuccinum_pustulosum_ranelliforme_41.jpg.2268712c23c732fa4cc5e17d5a49f465.jpg

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