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Marine Fossils in Flint


Microslides

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Hi to all you fossil guys,

 

I’ve been dealing in and collecting antique microscope slides for many years, so I am familiar with viewing micro fossils and and fossil sections under the microscope, but the specimens on the slide seen in the attached image were a real eye-opener to me.  I had no idea such incredible three-dimensional detail could be preserved, amber-like, in flint. My question is, is this type of preservation is common?

 

The slide is the standard 3”x1” size. A location for the specimen is sadly lacking, but certainly somewhere in the UK. 

 

I look forward to understanding these little fossils in more detail. 

 

Thanks,

 

Peter

 

 

 

 

3C43E954-CEC2-45CA-8823-A8C9E28200B7.jpeg

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Antique slides--what a wonderfully unusual hobby to collect!

 

Flint is a cryptocrystalline form of quartz and is a form of chert. The Wikipedia article on chert does indicate that microfossils are not unknown from chert nodules.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chert

 

Can we see (or can you transcribe) the species name written on the slide label?

 

Welcome to the forum.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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30 minutes ago, digit said:

Can we see (or can you transcribe) the species name written on the slide label?

Welcome to the forum.

Cheers.

-Ken

 

Ken, 

All I can see is that it says "Marine organisms" .

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Ah, I see it now. I saw cropped italic print and assumed (without looking closely) that it was a species name.

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Looks like a foram to Me.

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could be a disc bryozoa similar to this Paleogene one. 1/4 to 1/2" in diameter, some smaller.

coral 1w.jpg

coral2w.jpg

coral3w.jpg

coral4w.jpg

coral8 x30w.jpg

coral8w.jpg

coral9w.jpg

 

coral10w.jpg

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1 minute ago, Herb said:

could be a disc coral similar to this Paleogene one.

Big difference in size?

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6 hours ago, Herb said:

could be a disc coral similar to this Paleogene one. 1/4 to 1/2" in diameter, some smaller.

Herb, your specimen is a free living bryozoan similar to Discoporella.

 

 

11D3AF51-A27B-4542-92FD-93C1B7F17F07.png

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Lovely specimen. There appear to be quite a few sponge spicules floating around in there too, mostly monaxons.

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Lovely specimen! Can you post pictures of some of your other fossil slides?

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11 hours ago, Al Dente said:

Herb, your specimen is a free living bryozoan similar to Discoporella.

 

 

11D3AF51-A27B-4542-92FD-93C1B7F17F07.png

You are correct, bad labeling, my bad, thx

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hello,

 

the larger fossil is a bryozoan. Unlike the propositions being made it is not a free-living Lunulites/'Discoporella',

but more likely Radiopora. 

The smaller specimen could also be a bryozoan, but the important details are not visble.

 

Here a Radiopora from the Upper Cretaceous of Maastricht.

 

Beste wishes,

Oliver

Radiopora_diadema_2.jpg

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On 20.2.2019 at 10:12 AM, Al Dente said:

I would guess the specimen in flint is a sponge.

I would agree.

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