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Revisited an Ophthalmosaurus (meaning “eye lizard” in Greek) icenicus ichthyosaur vertebra from my collection. And decided to apply a paraloid solution to complete the preparation of this find to help stabilise the RARE Secarodus polyprion hybodont shark tooth attached, which was possibly scavenging the animal at the time.

 

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3 hours ago, DE&i said:

Thought you would like to see it.

You were correct!

Nice association piece.

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Nice example of scavanger  - prey association. Sharks easily lose teeth doing there chomping. Are there any scrape marks evident on the vert ? Though i can see the surface of the bone is eroded away so may be difficult but some dig in far enough to perhaps leave a gouge.

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