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Ramo

Crinoid, blastoid? From flint hills of Kansas

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Ramo

My brother found this years ago in the flinthills region of Kansas.  He lost it for years, and just re-discovered it in some storage.  I know next to nothing about things like this.  Can anyone give me an I'd, or any info I can pass on to him?

2819.jpeg

2822.jpeg

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Fossildude19

Definitely a crinoid calyx, Ramo. 

Can't help with a further ID, however. 

Great piece!  :) 

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FossilDAWG

A really excellent crinoid calyx and arms!!  :wub: :envy:

 

Don

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abyssunder

Beautiful! :)

It has biserial arms.

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Al Dente

Very nice. I collected in the Flint Hills for a number of years and never saw a crinoid this nice.

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Archie

Very nice piece!

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caldigger

She's a beauty alright! :wub:

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fifbrindacier

:envy::envy:

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BobWill

Beautiful! It's so rare to get to see a complete crinoid in 3-D, and it's not even from Crawfordsville :)

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Coco

Hi,

 

Very nice !

 

Coco

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Rockwood

Just a note for beginners: The arms are at the bottom in the first photo. The second photo shows where the stem was attached.

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Ramo

Thanks for all the replys.  I'll let him know how special this is.  Here's a picture looking down on the top.

2824.jpeg

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MrR

Beautiful form, regardless of what it is. One angle looks like a mini sarcophagus. So nice and symmetrical. Congratulations!

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BobWill

There are way too many species of crinoids to try for an ID without knowing what is usually found in the region where it came from but for comparison with something with similar features you might look at Graffhamicrinus wolforum. This is a Pennsylvanian age species and I believe there are exposures in Kansas from that time but the Flint Hills may be Permian.

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Carl

Absolutely exquisite!

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Zenmaster6

:dinothumb::envy::dinothumb:

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Kato

Okay, I do have to say I LOVE it!

 

Now, onto my question, I grew up in the Flint Hills and explored many counties, many outcrops, road cuts, old quarries, etc. Never did I find anything approximating an entire calyx. Plenty of somewhat lengthy crinoid columns (up to 6") and plenty of sections of a calyx still cemented together. Those were what I'd call grossly cemented...as to hide any features. I found crinoids in shale and those were even more disarticulated though much easier to see fine details.

 

How is this specimen cemented just enough to stay together and yet somehow able to be removed intact? 

 

It is hard to see any cementation whatsoever if you download the photo and zoom in. What a fantastic find. Too bad your brother can't remember where he found it (county would provide some lead as to formation or vice versa)...for instance Fort Riley Limestone would be Geary, Riley counties or those counties would be the upper formations of the Permian.

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Rockwood
38 minutes ago, Kato said:

How is this specimen cemented just enough to stay together and yet somehow able to be removed intact?

Wouldn't the obvious answer be that there is an intact cast of the lumen/body cavity at the core ?

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Ramo

I actually know exactly where it was found.  It was in wabunsee county.  There is a small exposure of gravely rock that is made up of tons of crinoid pieces, and fusilids.  Right now we have snow cover, but sometime this spring I'll get some photos of the location, and some photos of the usual fossils from there.

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Ramo

It was just laying on the ground exactly as seen in these photos loose from matrix.

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Kato
24 minutes ago, Ramo said:

I actually know exactly where it was found.  It was in wabunsee county.  There is a small exposure of gravely rock that is made up of tons of crinoid pieces, and fusilids.  Right now we have snow cover, but sometime this spring I'll get some photos of the location, and some photos of the usual fossils from there.

Thanks! I have hunted from Wamego on down to Alma in the road cuts and off some of the gravel roads. There are some great country roads with lots of exposures. Especially down by Alma there is a lot of formations to see and lots of floating material on the ground.

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crinus

Can you provide a picture of the anal side (other side) of the crinoid.  The structure of the plates there will help with the ID.

Joe

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Zenmaster6
1 hour ago, crinus said:

Can you provide a picture of the anal side (other side) of the crinoid.  The structure of the plates there will help with the ID.

Joe

Second that

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Uncle Siphuncle

Most of us, me included, could ever expect to find a better crinoid crown.  Well done.

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Ramo

Here is another view.

2826.jpeg

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