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I found these bony fish ear bones on various trip to Brownies Beach, this one with four are I believe Sciaenops sp. The one with three are Micromesistius cognatus, and the last one with six are Pogonias sp.

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Very cool! 

I'll bet many people don't recognize these cool little fossils for what they actually are!

Thanks for posting them! 

 

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Hi,

 

Nice. Have a look on my signature for recent otoliths ! ;)

 

Coco

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Really nice.  As already said most collectors wouldn't recognize these as fish otoliths.  What are you using to id these?  Elasmo.com has a good number of Miocene/Pliocene otoliths shown in its Lee Creek Teleosts section.  Coco also has a good number of extant fish otoliths identified with great pictures and a French paper reference in her TFF post as stated above.

 

Marco Sr.

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Very interesting.:)

I must admit, I would not have recognized them as fossils. 

Nice to learn new things. 

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1 hour ago, MarcoSr said:

What are you using to id these? 

One of the better publications I’ve seen for identifying East Coast fossil otoliths is Muller’s 1999 publication Ichthyofaunen aus dem  Atlantischen Tertiar der USA. It has very nice drawings of many otoliths and shark teeth.

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I am now realizing how many of these I have likely seen and then passed over. 

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Hi everyone,  Thank you for your kind comments.  The source I use to identify the otoliths is a new book entitled The Geology and Vertebrate Paleontology of Calvert Cliffs, Maryland, USA edited by Stephen J. Godfrey published in 2018.  Printed by the Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press.  Since it was printed using tax paper's money it cannot be sold anywhere.  However,  if you go to this link you should be able to download a copy of the book.   https://opensi.si.edu/index.php/smithsonian/catalog/book/107  or just search by the title on the internet.  For the otoliths, scroll down to page 205 they show actual pictures of 16 different otoliths.  Other than the three I posted I have a few more that I haven't been able to id.  I was able to obtain a hard copy of the book.  I also have otoliths from the site in Aquasco, Md, same formation as the Cliffs (Calvert Frm).  Will post some pictures of them soon.

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