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MrBones

Large echinoid

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MrBones

I found this echinoid fossil a few months ago. It is about 10cm long, I have only ever found two of these.

It was found on a rocky beach in Abu Dhabi, UAE

20190225_200734.thumb.jpg.033cff79114d4e9ece9df1b50a736f19.jpg

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MrBones

20190225_200721.thumb.jpg.391e7fff808885ea12b732d3b84076e3.jpg

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Ludwigia

Looks like Clypeaster.

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abyssunder

I agree with Roger.

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Tidgy's Dad

I agree with @abyssunder:D

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Phevo

Would anyone come with an example of a similar clypeaster? 

Based on the intruding petaloids and elongated shape i dont see the connection

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Quer

I know nothing about clypeaster, but it seems Hemipneustes to me, a rare Maastrichtian echinoid genus which, according to Fossilworks, is found in Spain... and Oman (Hemipneustes persicus). This is a piece I have of Hemipneustes pyrenaicus, whith have similar size:

 

DSC_0129.thumb.JPG.b2e3e354f0aae5f21468a962c76f6a6e.JPG

 

Strata information would be most helpful...

 

 

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Ludwigia
1 hour ago, Phevo said:

Would anyone come with an example of a similar clypeaster? 

Based on the intruding petaloids and elongated shape i dont see the connection

I can see your point now. I just said that it looks like one to me. What would you suggest?

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abyssunder

Hemipneustes or similar holasterid might be a good guess. The misleading character might be the curvature of the petal rows. Now I can see in a blow-up, that they are not turning back to the starting point.
For future determination of fossils, it will be good to have images taken from six sides, as it was suggested many times before. Geological settings might be on help, also. :)

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MrBones
6 hours ago, Quer said:

I know nothing about clypeaster, but it seems Hemipneustes to me, a rare Maastrichtian echinoid genus which, according to Fossilworks, is found in Spain... and Oman (Hemipneustes persicus). This is a piece I have of Hemipneustes pyrenaicus, whith have similar size:

 

DSC_0129.thumb.JPG.b2e3e354f0aae5f21468a962c76f6a6e.JPG

 

Strata information would be most helpful...

 

 

This one looks more like it, I googled clypeaster, but it looked more like a sand dollar then an urchin. I found this on a beach, and it is encased in very hard clay with rocks and shells. I do not know it's strata.

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caterpillar
This is not a Clypeaster and even less a Hemipneustes. On Clypeaster, the ambulacres are wider and raised. On Hemipneustes, the even-numbered ambulacres are on test.
Here we have a sea urchin with hollow ambulacres, in depression.

 
 

20190225_200721.thumb.jpg.391e7fff808885ea12b732d3b84076e3.jpg

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caterpillar

Maybe an Iraniaster bowersi with his flexural rear ambulacres. N°4

Sans nom 1.odt

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MrBones

Here are some more photos

20190226_131646.thumb.jpg.a64de2515c97e5e024baa91432443562.jpg

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MrBones

20190226_131622.thumb.jpg.f4ec76e8477d039fb4ea4137050eee76.jpg

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MrBones

This photo shows the side of the fossil, the line running trough is the underside of the fossil, the sides have been eroded off20190226_131441.thumb.jpg.da47c3804a0b098aeb5c98080efc6d39.jpg

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caterpillar

We have to know exactly the level. Have you found other fossils with this echinoid?

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MrBones

I have found other echinoids in the same location.

20190224_110059.thumb.jpg.9d51bcc38436fcfcb9a1228e40150b01.jpg

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abyssunder

Some of the other echinoids really look like Clypeaster.

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caterpillar

Yes, the other are Clypeaster

If you have found these echinoid in the same level, your first echinoid is not Iraniaster because it's cretaceous genus and Clypeaster is miocene

Maybe Pericosmus

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/221956981_Echinoid_assemblages_as_a_tool_for_palaeoenvironmental_reconstruction_-_An_example_from_the_Early_Miocene_of_Egypt

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Phevo
18 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

I can see your point now. I just said that it looks like one to me. What would you suggest?

 

I didn't have a good suggestion unfortunately, as I haven't Come across similar specimens in the dtrata i usually Hunt 

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