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blackmoth

How small can a nautiloid be?

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blackmoth

form the late carb/early permian statum in Shanxi, China. The coil does remsemble an evolute nautilus, but it is only 6mm in diameter.

I guess ome could not say it is a young nautilus or something, as the conch is hard material , and old part can could not change with growth.

too big for fusulina. and not  like a gastropod either.

微信图片_20190228090724.jpg

Wed Feb 27 21-45-01.jpg

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BobWill

I think you mean Nautiloid since Nautilus in an extant genus. In answer to tour question, I don't know any that small but this fossil is not preserved well enough to say it's a nautiloid for sure unless it is from a site with known fauna and very little diversity. I don't see any reason it could not be a planispiral gastropod or an ammonoid like Xenodiscus waageni which would be small enough.

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Fossildude19

This is a small Devonian goniatite, Tornoceras uniangulare.

 

S20170123_0036.jpg

 

That said, I can't make out any suture lines on your item. 

It could very well be a gastropod. 

Enlarged, cropped and brightened:

5c77361b44b1c__20190228090724.thumb.jpg.ff39c9a1778a3ab919292a65b273cb40.jpg

 

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Rockwood

Here is an illustration of the scale at which a gastropod shell begins to form.

wiki

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Manticocerasman

Nautiloids can be that small, but in my opinion this is a Straparollid or Euomphalid gastropod. 

 

 

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Ludwigia

I agree with Manticocerasman.

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BobWill
15 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

This is a small Devonian goniatite, Tornoceras uniangulare.

 

S20170123_0036.jpg

 

That said, I can't make out any suture lines on your item. 

It could very well be a gastropod. 

Enlarged, cropped and brightened:

 

 

 

Right size but too involute.

 

14 hours ago, Rockwood said:

Here is an illustration of the scale at which a gastropod shell begins to form.

wiki

 

Small enough but this fossils has so many whorls.

I agree that it most likely is some planispiral gastropod.

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Fossildude19
7 minutes ago, BobWill said:

 

Right size but too involute.

I was merely illustrating that ammonoids could be small. ;) 

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Rockwood

In general, it's much easier to be small. :)

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blackmoth
On 2019/2/28 at 3:42 PM, Manticocerasman said:

Nautiloids can be that small, but in my opinion this is a Straparollid or Euomphalid gastropod. 

 

 

image.png.19576516957eda908caca2f26bc36793.png

This is a 1937 report of the gastropods of the same area, same stratum. The specimen are bigger though ( largest is about 30mm, while the bigger one I have is only 1mm across) .

gastropod.jpg

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Manticocerasman
16 minutes ago, blackmoth said:

 

This is a 1937 report of the gastropods of the same area, same stratum. The specimen are bigger though ( largest is about 30mm, while the bigger one I have is only 1mm across) .

 

I've seen specimens of those up to 60mm across in the carboniferous layers in my area, but also smaller juvenile ones not bigger than a few mm.

 

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