Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Tidgy's Dad

The Cricosomia is stunning. :envy:

How do you prep them? Just pins? 

I love the brachiopods too, of course.:wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tidgy's Dad
23 minutes ago, connorp said:

I started off using sewing needles. The fossils tend to lie on a single bedding plane, so I would poke nearby matrix until it broke off, and usually would split cleanly away from the fossil. I recently got a box of hypodermic needles that I use in a pin vice. They were recommended by a member, I can't remember who, but I am very grateful to them. Hypodermic needles have edges near the tip which I've been using to slowly scrape away matrix rather than poking. They leave no tool marks and there is a lot less possibility for damage. I'm currently working on prepping out some arthropod appendages and it seems to be going well.

Yes, I've heard good things about the hypodermic needles. 

Will have to get some for my pin vice. 

Good luck with the arthropod appendages. :fingerscrossed:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
piranha

Congrats on all the excellent fossils! :fistbump:

 

Btw, the status has not changed since I first mentioned it on your other thread three years ago: Nemiana simplex is still synonymized with Beltanelliformis brunsae

 

Ivantsov 2018 and Ivantsov et al. 2014 elaborate further:

 

The presence of remains of Beltanelliformis and two varieties of its preservation, “Nemiana” and “Beltanelloides”, has been recorded in the Upper Vendian of eastern Europe (Mogilev-Podolsky Group of Podolia, Ust-Pinega Formation of the Southeastern White sea region, Kairovo Group of Cisuralia, Chernyi Kamen Formation of the Middle Urals), Yakutia (Khatyspyt Formation of the Olenek Uplift), China (Doushantuo Formation of the Yangtze River valley), northwestern Canada (Blueflower Formation in the Wernecke Mountains), southern Namibia (Dabis Formation) and southern Australia (Ediacara Member of the Flinders Ranges) (see a publication review in Ivantsov et al., 2014).

 

Ivantsov, A.Y. 2018

Vendian Macrofossils of the Yudoma Group, Southeast of the Siberian Platform.

Paleontological Journal 52(12):1335-1346

 

 

Abstract—Two groups of Precambrian macrofossils are reexamined. Members of the first group are usually determined as Nemiana simplex Palij, 1976 and regarded as remains of animal organisms; members of the second are often determined as Beltanelloides sorichevae Sokolov, 1965 and assigned to green algae or cyanobacteria. The cooccurrence of the two groups in burials of the White Sea outcrops, the similarity in morphology, and the presence of transitional forms suggest that they could have been variants of preservation of the same extinct species. As a result of critical analysis of published data and examination of available type specimens, the species Beltanelliformis brunsae Menner, 1974, Beltanelloides podolicus A. Istchenko, 1988, Hagenetta aarensis Hahn et Pflug, 1988, Medusinites paliji Gureev, 1987, and Namamedusium wendti Zessin, 2008 are assigned to the same species. Beltanelliformis brunsae is regarded as the senior synonym.

 

...Thus, despite obvious similarity of the groups “Nemiana” and “Beltanelloides,” scientists frequently believe that they sharply differ in nature. However, in the present paper, it is accepted that the two groups are only different preservation forms of biogenic formations of the genus Beltanelliformis.

 

A series of species names, i.e., Beltanelloides sorichevae, B. podolicus, Hagenetta aarensis, Medusinites paliji, Nemiana simplex, and Namamedusium wendti, are synonyms of Beltanelliformis brunsae Menner, 1974. Fossils are preserved in two main forms: “Nemiana,” three dimensional molds on the sole of sandstone beds; and “Beltanelloides,” flat imprints inside the strata of mudstones or thinlayer carbonates.

 

Ivantsov, A.Y., Gritsenko, V.P., Konstantinenko, L.I., Zakrevskaya, M.A. 2014
Revision of the Problematic Vendian Macrofossil Beltanelliformis (= Beltanelloides, Nemiana).
Paleontological Journal, 48(13):1423-1448   LINK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
connorp
1 hour ago, piranha said:

Congrats on all the excellent fossils! :fistbump:

 

Btw, the status has not changed since I first mentioned it on your other thread three years ago: Nemiana simplex is still synonymized with Beltanelliformis brunsae

 

Ivantsov 2018 and Ivantsov et al. 2014 elaborate further:

 

The presence of remains of Beltanelliformis and two varieties of its preservation, “Nemiana” and “Beltanelloides”, has been recorded in the Upper Vendian of eastern Europe (Mogilev-Podolsky Group of Podolia, Ust-Pinega Formation of the Southeastern White sea region, Kairovo Group of Cisuralia, Chernyi Kamen Formation of the Middle Urals), Yakutia (Khatyspyt Formation of the Olenek Uplift), China (Doushantuo Formation of the Yangtze River valley), northwestern Canada (Blueflower Formation in the Wernecke Mountains), southern Namibia (Dabis Formation) and southern Australia (Ediacara Member of the Flinders Ranges) (see a publication review in Ivantsov et al., 2014).

 

Ivantsov, A.Y. 2018

Vendian Macrofossils of the Yudoma Group, Southeast of the Siberian Platform.

Paleontological Journal 52(12):1335-1346

 

 

Abstract—Two groups of Precambrian macrofossils are reexamined. Members of the first group are usually determined as Nemiana simplex Palij, 1976 and regarded as remains of animal organisms; members of the second are often determined as Beltanelloides sorichevae Sokolov, 1965 and assigned to green algae or cyanobacteria. The cooccurrence of the two groups in burials of the White Sea outcrops, the similarity in morphology, and the presence of transitional forms suggest that they could have been variants of preservation of the same extinct species. As a result of critical analysis of published data and examination of available type specimens, the species Beltanelliformis brunsae Menner, 1974, Beltanelloides podolicus A. Istchenko, 1988, Hagenetta aarensis Hahn et Pflug, 1988, Medusinites paliji Gureev, 1987, and Namamedusium wendti Zessin, 2008 are assigned to the same species. Beltanelliformis brunsae is regarded as the senior synonym.

 

...Thus, despite obvious similarity of the groups “Nemiana” and “Beltanelloides,” scientists frequently believe that they sharply differ in nature. However, in the present paper, it is accepted that the two groups are only different preservation forms of biogenic formations of the genus Beltanelliformis.

 

A series of species names, i.e., Beltanelloides sorichevae, B. podolicus, Hagenetta aarensis, Medusinites paliji, Nemiana simplex, and Namamedusium wendti, are synonyms of Beltanelliformis brunsae Menner, 1974. Fossils are preserved in two main forms: “Nemiana,” three dimensional molds on the sole of sandstone beds; and “Beltanelloides,” flat imprints inside the strata of mudstones or thinlayer carbonates.

 

Ivantsov, A.Y., Gritsenko, V.P., Konstantinenko, L.I., Zakrevskaya, M.A. 2014
Revision of the Problematic Vendian Macrofossil Beltanelliformis (= Beltanelloides, Nemiana).
Paleontological Journal, 48(13):1423-1448   LINK

Thank you. I was aware (or at least of the opinion?) that Beltanelliformis and Nemiana were the same, but good to know that Beltanelliformis is now the senior synonym.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ludwigia
4 hours ago, connorp said:

Here is probably my favorite specimen. It is an Anomalocaris saron appendage from Chengjiang with several partial Redlichia trilobites. Anomalocaris appendages are not uncommon, but ones this well preserved are quite hard to find.

a_saron.thumb.jpg.ed5d82657f560aedf0b3b3df83a40abe.jpg

 

Excellent acquisition! Thanks for sharing.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico

What an incredible collection that has made a very interesting thread. I love the Cricocosmia so beautifully preserved.   :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
connorp

Heliomedusa orienta, a fairly common brachiopod from Chengjiang. If you look closely at the upper left region, you can see that some setae are preserved. This is easily one of my favorite specimens.

 

IMG_5418.thumb.jpg.4d99a22aebb69791eda8af256e52c202.jpg

 

Some exceptionally preserved specimens, such as the one below, even have the lophophore preserved.

 

5c8c00cd44bcd_ScreenShot2019-03-15at3_44_52PM.png.5a816f68bfbf853fcfde8da9fab3527e.png

Image credit: "Architecture and function of the lophophore in the problematic brachiopod Heliomedusa orienta (Early Cambrian, South China)" (Zhang et al. 2009).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot

Stunning collection!

Looking forward to seeing more of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
connorp

A negative impression of Yunnancephalus yunanensis, a moderately common Chengjiang trilobite. Not the best specimen, until you look at the upper left region of the cephalon and notice a small fragment of the antenna is preserved! There are also several brachiopods on the matrix, likely Diandongia pista.

 

IMG_5419.thumb.jpg.e9a68e48097b4a3e69f843f0f983f0f6.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tidgy's Dad

Amazing, the trilobite and the anomalocarid are superb, but I love the brachiopods, especially the Heliomedusa. :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
connorp

A gorgeous near-complete Malungia laevigata trilobite from the Lower Cambrian Heilinpu formation that I just received in the mail today.

 

5c8fde0123187_ScreenShot2019-03-18at2_05_33PM.thumb.png.d0101cf017cdbf11524b285bf340415f.png

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
connorp

22A7BF99-6AF9-42AF-8987-BDEAFFA639DE.thumb.jpeg.e7f1f5d53ae1f56db69a4086e30a904b.jpeg

 

Leanchoilia illecebrosa arthropod I just finished cleaning up. The legs are not amazingly preserved, but I didn’t think they were even there when I first purchased this specimen. I’m quite satisfied with how this turned out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wrangellian

Ah, very nice stuff! I have a soft spot for the 'early life' fossils too and I've got some of the same ones as you have, some of which I have posted here and there on TFF, but I haven't yet managed a nice Anomalocaris appendage like yours, nor a Haplophrentis (thought I do have other hyolithids).

I've noticed the poor prepping attempts on the specimens we get from Chengjiang, but I'm afraid to try prepping them myself for fear of puncturing the fossil like the Chinese preppers sometimes do!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
connorp
2 hours ago, Wrangellian said:

Ah, very nice stuff! I have a soft spot for the 'early life' fossils too and I've got some of the same ones as you have, some of which I have posted here and there on TFF, but I haven't yet managed a nice Anomalocaris appendage like yours, nor a Haplophrentis (thought I do have other hyolithids).

I've noticed the poor prepping attempts on the specimens we get from Chengjiang, but I'm afraid to try prepping them myself for fear of puncturing the fossil like the Chinese preppers sometimes do!

I was definitely worried at first. But once you get a feel for the matrix (which is incredibly soft) it’s not that bad. I practiced on a couple Cricocrosmia partials which can easily be found for a few bucks. All you need is magnification and a steady hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×