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ziggycardon

Hi everyone

I think I just found a new hobby :D 
With my latest fossil delivery I recieved quite a lot of microfossils & matrix vials as the world of microfossils was something that I have been long interested in. 
So a 2 weeks ago I finally ordered my first microfossils for which I reserved a special drawer in my archive cabinet.

5c8d374470230_155251024038876147(12).jpg.a59a3ca3fdb3fc75bf2cabb0eda4c57b.jpg
So here is a recapp of what I all got: 
3 vials of permian material from Waurika, Oklahoma
1 vial of permian material from The red beds of Archer County, Texas
1 small vial of Conodont rich Mississippian material from the Chappel Limestone formation, Texas
1 small vial of Cretaceous Lower Gault Clay, East Wear bay, Folkestone, Kent, UK
A micropalaeontology slide with Jurassic Blue Lias matrix rich in holothurian material.

A thin section of an Ostracods filled Elimia snail from the Green River Formation in Wyoming
A thin section from the Rhynie chert of Scotland which should contain preserved parts of the plant Aglaophyton major and perhaps even other species.
I also got a lot of Bull Canyon micro fossil teeth and 2 cretaceous mammal teeth from Hell Creek

In this topic you will be able to follow my path through this newly discovered hobby as I will post my finds and progress :D 
Currently I am only working with a clip-on cellphone microscope, but I do plan on getting a professional microscope in the next few months! (Tips are always welcome) 

So let's put on our Ant-Man suit and explore the microfossil realm :D 
giphy.gif

So here are some of the first pictures I made of some of the microfossils

 

Starting with the thin slices! :) 
5c8d3a0b01209_155259057574510702(9).jpg.2a1f42eece67559f6cf21be09f658bca.jpg

 

Thin slice with Ostracon filled Elimia tenara snail from the Green River Formation, Wyoming
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5c8d3a1c2b2c2_155275702936947318(1).jpg.de7a7acefd659cfc9d2843baffeabdab.jpg

155275702936947318.jpg.cbcee90774cda8655dee8f63b21a526b.jpg

 

Thin slice with Aglaophyton major from Rhynie Chert in Scotland
5c8d397f52cc1_155259057574510702(11).thumb.jpg.fa4806409356ee83330746d15bf98a56.jpg

5c8d3980382d2_155259057574510702(12).thumb.jpg.bd9176c0e85fb6b5b8d4166685308a11.jpg

5c8d3af641a9e_155275702936947318(2).thumb.jpg.06b0acf95308d98c437075fdfe104561.jpg

5c8d3af7551dc_155275702936947318(3).thumb.jpg.201b552b30dd8f2f5aa2c402768aa841.jpg

 

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Pagurus

Happy hunting! That gastropod filled with ostracods is fantastic. :trilosurprise:

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Manticocerasman

@ziggycardon

 

If you like small fossils, I stil have a few kilograms of gravel composed  mostly out of crinoid stems from the tournaisian of Soignies.

It is fun to sort out all the different crinoid species in this. I can keep some of it appart for you if you like.

 

do you go to the fossil fair in Gent tomorrow? 

 

cheers,

Kevin

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ziggycardon
1 hour ago, Manticocerasman said:

@ziggycardon

 

If you like small fossils, I stil have a few kilograms of gravel composed  mostly out of crinoid stems from the tournaisian of Soignies.

It is fun to sort out all the different crinoid species in this. I can keep some of it appart for you if you like.

 

do you go to the fossil fair in Gent tomorrow? 

 

cheers,

Kevin

There is a fossil fair tomorrow in Gent?! :o 
snarge I didn't knew that, if I knew earlier I probably would have asked a day off at work tomorrow and gone since I already missed paleotime last week.

But thanks for letting me know, I will put in in the agenda for next year! Maybe better that I can't attent, spend way too much money on fossils already this month.  :) 

 

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ziggycardon

I started doing some exploring in one of the matrix vials today, not very long though, only took a peek at it for about 15 minutes or so but I already did find some cool things in that time! 
The Vial consisted out of matrix from The Archer City Formation, Red Beds, Archer County, Texas. 
Here are a few things I found in there. 

A serrated tooth, I don't think it's shark so I would guess reptilian, maybe synapsid? I don't really know yet.
And I also spotted a piece of spine next to it.
5c8d6c4b2f3d3_155277190372292904(1).jpg.013b3ee23e22c10d7bca29369af108f5.jpg

I don't know what the long thingy is above but the thing under it looks like a tooth, shark or amphibian perhaps?

5c8d6c4c9436e_155277190372292904(2).jpg.d95a775cca15b36e183719e09dc89fe8.jpg

Another tooth and a piece of scale or dermal plate?

5c8d6c4d8976a_155277190372292904(3).thumb.jpg.6151834c25f803e4f1628bcb197a0550.jpg

I really love this tooth, it kinda looks like it has a pathology.

5c8d6c4e4eede_155277190372292904(4).jpg.c370975b7c5a628d715cba2b667d7294.jpg

This looks to me like a skull plate, perhaps from an amphibian

5c8d6c4fcb7c7_155277190372292904(5).thumb.jpg.fde086b830ec888a863aa7a0fa7bcaa3.jpg

shark tooth

5c8d6c508cc0c_155277190372292904(6).jpg.938732e5e790063e268aace7b8f197be.jpg
I do know this one! My best find from the matrix, a Barbclabornia tooth! :D 

155277190372292904.jpg

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ziggycardon

Been exploring a bit more with my microscope these last days. 

Here are a few photo's of things I found interesting :)

 

The specimens below all come from the Hastings Bone beds, Weald Clay, Wealdon of Bexhill, Wealden Supergroup, Bexhill, Sussex, UK (135 million years old)

 

A Hybodontid tooth

155352727514938911.jpeg.b772e8363a73052050d6097581be88b9.jpeg

 

A Bernissartia tooth

5c98f3d1c0f4f_155352727514938911(2).thumb.jpeg.118f309c93ad25620b48c772eadaa65b.jpeg

 

A fish tooth plate

5c98f3bcb68f3_155352727514938911(1).thumb.jpeg.d1431286bdd4bf2bc3279da94e062df1.jpeg

 

An unidentified hollow bone or tooth fragment

5c98f3e19a8d1_155352727514938911(3).thumb.jpeg.7a6b3fac800e29f9ab4c2acdb1ce028d.jpeg

5c98f3f55b5b0_155352727514938911(4).jpeg.cd8d6cd0c724aae6538c3663da511654.jpeg

 

An Unidentified tooth

5c98f40349f8b_155352727514938911(5).thumb.jpeg.9b18e5dfc39d7e7ae4f9be8187bd07ba.jpeg

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Pagurus
5 minutes ago, ziggycardon said:

Been exploring a bit more with my microscope these last days. 

 

Be careful, it's easy to get lost for hours, days, weeks, years... in that little hole.

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connorp

Another hobby?! Great pictures though. You might want to look into some of those magnifying gem cases to showcase your best finds.

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ziggycardon
3 hours ago, Pagurus said:

 

Be careful, it's easy to get lost for hours, days, weeks, years... in that little hole.

Jepp I already noticed :D 
I really love the microfossil world, really love going through the matrix to find some new discoveries! :) 
I only need to look for a proper microscope, the one I am working with is only a clip-on microscope for the smartphone.
 

2 hours ago, connorp said:

Another hobby?! Great pictures though. You might want to look into some of those magnifying gem cases to showcase your best finds.

Funny that you mention it, cause yesterday I placed some on the matrix vials in magnifying gem cases. I couldn't really get them back in the small vials and thought immediately at those little magnifying cases :) 

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jpc

Great stuff, and great new sub-hobby.  

I would love to see the pix of the Hell Creek mammal teeth.They are among my favorites. 

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olorotitan

Really neat finds!  Your collection spans such a wide range of sizes from your massive spinosaur to these tiny specimens.  

 

What microscope are you thinking of getting?  I have a nice compound scope which can be great for prepped slides but very difficult to use for larger specimens.  I wish I went with a stereoscope instead.

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ziggycardon
31 minutes ago, jpc said:

Great stuff, and great new sub-hobby.  

I would love to see the pix of the Hell Creek mammal teeth.They are among my favorites. 

Thank you, yeah I am very into it! :) 
And you ask, I deliver, here are the photo's I took with my microscope from the teeth.


The first should be an incisor from an Altacreodus magnus
5c99308ab890b_155259057574510702(5).thumb.jpg.43662b9f00eeb3d5bbf04dbcac72ca6f.jpg

 

The second should be premolar from an Alphadon marshi

5c99308b8ec0e_155259057574510702(6).thumb.jpg.555495b1f84a1a86aa33767c49f56369.jpg

 

31 minutes ago, olorotitan said:

Really neat finds!  Your collection spans such a wide range of sizes from your massive spinosaur to these tiny specimens.  

 

What microscope are you thinking of getting?  I have a nice compound scope which can be great for prepped slides but very difficult to use for larger specimens.  I wish I went with a stereoscope instead.

Thank you! It's indeed my goal to get a collection that's a diverse as it can possible get! :) 

Well I am not sure, not really knowlegdable enough to make a decisive decision yet.
But my usual fossil store has 2 on sale that kinda interest me, but I am not sure if they are good enough for microfossils.

I am currently doubting between the "Stereomicroscope Euromex StereoBlue SB.1902P" which sells for € 456 and the "Stereomicroscope Euromex StereoBlue SB.1903P" which sells for € 499,50
 

Both are pretty similar, the only difference is that the second one can be expanded with parts that allow for micro photography. 

Here are the specs of both microscopes:
Magnification: 7 - 45x zoom
Magnification with Close-up lens: Lens SB.8905: 3,5x - 22x zoom
Image field: 28,5 - 4,4 mm
Working distance: 100 mm
Lighting: LED 1W
Objective: 0,7 - 4,5x zoom
Ocular lens: WF 10x/20mm
Size L*W*H: 266x220x317 mm

If anyone here is experienced with microfossils, feel free to weigh in! :) 

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ynot

Nice fossils. I love the micros too.

 

As for a microscope, many brands are good, just get one that has a digital camera attachment.

 

There has been a couple of threads on TFF that discus microscopes.

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jpc

if you can get one with a boom stand, it will be a thousand times more versatile...

The other things I like are continuous zoom and the ability to accept a Barlow lens.  

See the other posts about microscopes for more details.

 

SB.1902-U.png

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olorotitan

As jpc has already mentioned, being able to contimuously zoom and barlow finctionality is good, although at your price point Ziggy those are probably included.  

 

I think the boom stand can be incredibly useful, especially if you need to peer over a large specimen or one with much matrix.  But it will add significantly to the weight and space you will need.  A stereoscope on a simple stand may work as well if you're looking at small individual pieces.

 

As for the trinocular heads made for photography, can those be used with cell phones?  iirc those were designed for old fashioned film cameras.  Or you can photograph holding your phone up to the eye piece like I do, but the pics don't come out the best.

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ynot
2 hours ago, olorotitan said:

As for the trinocular heads made for photography, can those be used with cell phones? 

I doubt they are compatible.

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ziggycardon

@ynot, @jpc & @olorotitan 
thanks for the tips, will take a look at the threads here at the forum :) 

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ziggycardon

Some more photo's of more of my recent exploring.

This time through some matrix of Lower Gault Clay (Lower Cretaceous), East Wear Bay, Folkestone, Kent, UK

 

Here are some pictures of some of my findings

 

A few small ammonites or nautiloids

Or are they gastropods?

155371460356795418.jpeg.64a5ef4310509f43c2e224430ec5e7e3.jpeg

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I don't really know what this is, but they are quite abudent in the matrix.

coral of sponge?

5c9bd03a2ba35_155371460356795418(2).jpeg.749b5f3bd46656821b9e3bc5cab0e4cb.jpeg

a shell fragment?

5c9bd04c6f7c8_155371460356795418(3).jpeg.a0728a7be9e3efd7cccb1a91e1af6f2c.jpeg

Not really an idea of what this is.

5c9bd0692f804_155371460356795418(5).jpeg.c9f9ab600515b7f71f6c26f3d45e0a05.jpeg

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Bobby Rico

Brilliant thread. I could spend hours if I had a microscope with a camera.  Thank you Bobby 

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ynot

The round ones look like foramafer, the other 2 are shell bits.

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Al Dente
13 hours ago, ziggycardon said:

Some more photo's of more of my recent exploring.

This time through some matrix of Lower Gault Clay (Lower Cretaceous), East Wear Bay, Folkestone, Kent, UK

 

Here are some pictures of some of my findings

 

A few small ammonites or nautiloids

Or are they gastropods?

Tony is right, the ammonite shaped fossils are foraminifera. There are other foraminifera in your photos as well as some ostracod valves. Here’s a good website to explore- http://foraminifera.eu/

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ziggycardon
22 hours ago, Bobby Rico said:

Brilliant thread. I could spend hours if I had a microscope with a camera.  Thank you Bobby 

Thank you :) 
I do have a feeling I am gonna waste quite a lot of time with that microscope the coming years :D 
Although, time is never wasted when you have a good time ;) 
 

10 hours ago, Al Dente said:

Tony is right, the ammonite shaped fossils are foraminifera. There are other foraminifera in your photos as well as some ostracod valves. Here’s a good website to explore- http://foraminifera.eu/

Ooh thank you very much for the link! 
That's exactly what I have been needing! :D 
I am not yet knowledgable in the foraminifera (or microfossils in general) so that website is truly helpfull! :) 
Thank you very much!

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REW01

I know the last post here was a month ago, but I wanted to say something about your thin section. I also love seeing everyone's microfossil collections, as I don't have the capability to really start collecting my own right now. I'd love to get a set of thin sections going though. Especially acquiring some Rhynie Chert thin sections, since that's a very cool site for E. Devonian plant and fungi fossils.

On 3/16/2019 at 12:10 PM, ziggycardon said:

Thin slice with Aglaophyton major from Rhynie Chert in Scotland
5c8d397f52cc1_155259057574510702(11).thumb.jpg.fa4806409356ee83330746d15bf98a56.jpg

5c8d3980382d2_155259057574510702(12).thumb.jpg.bd9176c0e85fb6b5b8d4166685308a11.jpg

5c8d3af641a9e_155275702936947318(2).thumb.jpg.06b0acf95308d98c437075fdfe104561.jpg

In the third photo you can see a distinct darker ring of just a few cells not far from the outer edge of the cross section. Some of those cells probably contain arbuscular tissue from a fungus where hyphae infiltrated the cells of the rhizome. The first one, appears to be decayed (void in the center) and the second looks like an aerial stem, so no hyphae there. Similar associations have also been found with Rhynia and Nothia (probably genus Glomites as it's common). It's generally interpreted as a mycorrhizal-like association between plant and fungus. Asteroxylon mackiei has been found with (presumably) parasitic colonization of its rhizome. There's other fungal material besides those known from the chert, those are just the ones that came to mind here. 

 

Here's another example showing the fungi:

https://steurh.home.xs4all.nl/engrhyn/eaglao.html#glomites

 

I thought you might like to know a little more about your fossils! :D

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ziggycardon
10 hours ago, REW01 said:

I know the last post here was a month ago, but I wanted to say something about your thin section. I also love seeing everyone's microfossil collections, as I don't have the capability to really start collecting my own right now. I'd love to get a set of thin sections going though. Especially acquiring some Rhynie Chert thin sections, since that's a very cool site for E. Devonian plant and fungi fossils.

In the third photo you can see a distinct darker ring of just a few cells not far from the outer edge of the cross section. Some of those cells probably contain arbuscular tissue from a fungus where hyphae infiltrated the cells of the rhizome. The first one, appears to be decayed (void in the center) and the second looks like an aerial stem, so no hyphae there. Similar associations have also been found with Rhynia and Nothia (probably genus Glomites as it's common). It's generally interpreted as a mycorrhizal-like association between plant and fungus. Asteroxylon mackiei has been found with (presumably) parasitic colonization of its rhizome. There's other fungal material besides those known from the chert, those are just the ones that came to mind here. 

 

Here's another example showing the fungi:

https://steurh.home.xs4all.nl/engrhyn/eaglao.html#glomites

 

I thought you might like to know a little more about your fossils! :D

Thank you for your reply, Rhynnie Chert is indeed an amazing site for early devonian plant & fungi fossils. :) 
And thank you for the additional information, the seller did indeed state that multiple species of plant and fungi could be found in the thin slices but I didn't have the time yet explore the thin slice in detail, so I really appreciate the additional information, thank you. :) 

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ziggycardon

I've been buzy today with the microscope again :) 
 

One of the fossils I've examined isn't really a microfossil, but it still looks amazing under the microscope.
It are 2 juvenile Ichthyosaurus communis teeth found in the jurassic of Charmouth, Dorset, Jurassic Coast, UK (191 - 185 mya)

 

155800844850760986.jpg.de9bc8ca532e66166958a63a9904dcf1.jpg

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A photo of the jaw of an Anolis sp. from the Oligocene found in fissures in Brooksville site 2, Hernando county, Florida, USA (28 mya)

5cdd5e518d614_155800844850760986(26).jpg.7a0fdacbc3e5bdf291ab0bfd41023899.jpg

 

And I've taken some nice photo's of some very small Pyrope garnets from the Czech Republic. 

5cdd5e3dce69e_155800844850760986(27).thumb.jpg.6d399ff044d85556c5cb3483ebb4aee5.jpg

5cdd5e3ed1e4d_155800844850760986(28).thumb.jpg.3624f3f307c1f355f5a26e4741eaa1a1.jpg

5cdd5e3fcc391_155800844850760986(29).thumb.jpg.6d6597e764782f5b33960dcb890fcd18.jpg

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