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Virtual_Fossil

Mostly new to this fossil thing

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Virtual_Fossil

I wish I had enough knowledge even to ask intelligent questions but I really don't.  My wife found this on our property and we've curious about it.  We have found a number of other fossils but none like this.    Any information will be greatly appreciated.

IMG_20190317_153753.jpg

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DevonianDigger

Can you give some information about the location?

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ynot

Need a better idea of the size.

Those knives come in many sizes.

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Virtual_Fossil

Sorry I wasn't really prepared to take that photo.  That knife is the smallest Victorinox.   Each oval is about 2" diameter.

 

It was taken in NE Oklahoma, Osage County.   We're close to the peak of a hill  and have found a number of fossils including some big ones I"ve asked about in the past:

IMG_20161127_175305.jpg.03f44488ad7130d2a62a993ec6fe1860.jpg

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DevonianDigger

I have no idea what this is, but I'm really interested to find out.

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PaleoNoel
13 minutes ago, DevonianDigger said:

I have no idea what this is, but I'm really interested to find out.

Ditto

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Zenmaster6

Reminds me of something...

lycopods-lepidodendron-fossilised-bark-of-carboniferous-lepidodendron-FF01EK.jpg

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ynot

I think it is a plant again, have to wait for the botanist to comment.

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DPS Ammonite
3 hours ago, Virtual_Fossil said:

I wish I had enough knowledge even to ask intelligent questions but I really don't.  My wife found this on our property and we've curious about it.  We have found a number of other fossils but none like this.    Any information will be greatly appreciated.

IMG_20190317_153753.jpg

Zenmaster6 had a picture of a Lepidodendron, but included no name.

 

It looks like a tree from the Pennsylvanian, Mississippian or Permian periods, Lepidodendron. What are the ages of the rocks in your area?

 

See article about them from the Sam Noble Museum:

https://samnoblemuseum.ou.edu/common-fossils-of-oklahoma/plant-fossils/fossils-by-plant-group/fossil-lycophytes/

 

and

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=lepidodendron+fossil&client=safari&hl=en-us&prmd=isnv&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjAks71r43hAhWYCTQIHZwbDKgQ_AUoAXoECAwQAQ&biw=320&bih=454

6E9B82B4-E5B2-4A70-A64C-463B3CD00239.jpeg

 

Consider Syringodendron for the bottom photo:

https://steurh.home.xs4all.nl/engsig/esyringo.html

 

A2D42D84-5EB8-47A9-BBA1-5A62C139E711.png

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Rockwood

These look like stigmaria to me.

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Ludwigia

I'll go along with Rockwood and also say stigmaria for this one. Judging by the size of these imprints, the trees must have been quite large in your area.                 

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Kato

At first glance I would have thought some form of Sigillaria for your 1st photo and your 2nd photo was Syringodendron similar to what I find locally. The major difference is that your specimens are on such a HUGE scale in comparison to what I have seen.

 

Recently, I was studying about Synchysidendron and Diaphorodendron. They typically have very large scars such as the one in your photo and support the large scale thesis.

 

I don't know if there existed sub-species that formed such close rows of scarring as in your first photo but Diaphorodendron definitely had the scale and shape similarity to be considered.

 

As to your 2nd photo, with the numerous sets of parallel scars, Synchysidendron could be a possibility (if one does not accept Syringodendron).

 

In the photo shown here, my Syringodendron paired scars are physically much closer together and the separation between pairs is only 15mm gap. Again, yours are on a grander scale and probably a different species if Syringodendron.

 

image.thumb.png.96deafa3a70c8ec0ab205dd090c5a20a.png

 

Here is the link to the document to which I have been studying; GROWTH HABIT OF THE LATE PALEOZOIC RHIZOMORPHIC TREE-LYCOPSID FAMILY DIAPHORODENDRACEAE

 

Figures 4D for Synchysidendron and 10 A-B for Diaphorodendron may be of interest.

 

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/8436/f75eba2c6b24cd27b1abe7d7f87eb73cfd29.pdf

 

 

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Virtual_Fossil

FYI, the second picture I posted above was identified as Sigillaria.  I have 3 of those on the property, all a couple feet in diameter or more.   I had posted about these a couple years ago and had a paleobotanist come by to take a look.    Here's another one...

 

 

cjcplIHY03SM4W4rkNQmCCkl8VOobVE-nvz2d3SS4ej6d16UALVB-OaQlgYVxWpoHiuyXipcOvOYmNRqUk4lloeGvEdrT_XXJDgJ_5qmscLZO-krnvdfUqzlNC2oUbIwmCDmO2Ifizyf5T_WDLHcLcuBBMAQcuyrLFcYENZa8gHF6duh6Ti_-Fo6tvClGNKTP3kyHY6-R_1WLGNU-GPRANjP4g9bk8GsfRvNRhwANCgNE6WB9vWT_Rt6awF2dbMi1Lz4Jgr0jiEVQPcYewiGOKVzTh8PeaBpldz0SFE9yl9TNlpa6kD2bkPvTgRUQt9_v-8Gq5vb_0qvhCRhpQ521RSZUGr0bbevedsb-T8nCwpQKzRnTOJ4-E_U_zveY5Dau297jWrbS7DDjjXRMiPEf7VZGNqDxeEeQ1Yl-yf7ad5Ik31TbO_iAGGGnpyblLIT1n6XwetzOLNsEyHDgcEnurLrnD0UKULwlYlSL3YbSHOjfxx3gH9LLqq-MKvGqKTDOc0UbmizswVTkeFW4uer-0F1ec1eehTi8dnCf1OiEFAjq6Qpni8k0pmsmwiCuNeS7NxDgeoNiMY5H3BK61ivoNgvyvwDIfFHK7HZrjYeYWLQGCsQI0cfkF54EXgLGh1GV7aBc_tjQq2bmvoup5LhOQGYi4p4Qdc=w1263-h842-no

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ynot
8 minutes ago, Virtual_Fossil said:

 I had posted about these a couple years ago

I remember that. Was a nice discussion before it was identified.

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