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snakebite6769

Strange item I found near a phacops

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snakebite6769

I’m not sure what this is but I found it splitting shale that has trilobites and cephalopods and I think it’s devonian age. Hoping the pictures are good enough. It reminds me of a tooth from something I had seen a while ago...

 

E068564C-5441-42A1-ADB1-C6FD1E77F80C.thumb.jpeg.e18acc235125b604065d61e861e29fe4.jpegE6DDADE3-AAEA-4613-BA7B-09634494AA61.thumb.jpeg.73bf61b2e2b9bc116d0b1af16ee4f5c7.jpeg939B1388-EE82-4DB1-B73F-962CE69176D0.thumb.jpeg.4d702dc7c0e2b7133b356485b555c420.jpeg

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Rockwood

Looks like a sad remnant of a gastropod to me.

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snakebite6769

That’s what I thought at first but it has a very distinct shape which I have seen before but not here in NY. I need to get better images because it tapers up and then back down, with one high ridge in the middle followed outwards by two others getting smaller as they move outward

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Fossildude19

Hey Rob, 

That looks like a "squish out" of a Paleozygopleura hamiltonae.

 

939B1388-EE82-4DB1-B73F-962CE69176D0.jpeg.bb46db210d62684d70c0d4c81ddf2a95.jpeg

 

EDIT:   Hmm.   :zzzzscratchchin:

 

On second thought, ... It could be a phyllocarid mandible

Maybe @mcgcsp   @mikeymig   @GerryK will have a look.  

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Fossildude19

939B1388-EE82-4DB1-B73F-962CE69176D0.thumb.jpeg-vert.jpg

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Ludwigia

I'll go along with Tim at this point, but it would help further if you could post a few sharp close-ups.

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snakebite6769

Best I can do with my phone :(

 

 D642D342-ECAA-48DE-A00B-C672E4188C23.thumb.jpeg.ad5e629c50773e8b052aba08c5fface3.jpegCADC97BF-66D5-45B4-B140-E4231CFFB3FC.thumb.jpeg.1e3a1cd2e88885fba0423cb5c3833c5e.jpegDBC484BB-F10E-4DC1-9510-963775D3D6E1.thumb.jpeg.dc52f8f335caa4dec8894c25a0c75650.jpeg

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Fossildude19

Yup. Have to go with Phyllocarid mandible!

Great find, Rob!

This from Deep Springs Road? 

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Al Tahan

I second phyllocarid mandible! Nice find. 

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snakebite6769

Yes, it is Tim :) 

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snakebite6769

That would explain the tail section I found as well with the spines....I knew it looked familiar. Thanks guy for the assistance

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Fossildude19

Pictures, Rob, or it didn't happen. :P 

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snakebite6769

I will post them with this post tonight, I am picking up the 1879 hall, New York paleontology series books today from a gent up here. 

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mikeymig

First thought was Phyllocarid (Echinocaris) jaw. 

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piranha

Here is the description and figures from Hall & Clarke 1888:

 

Hall, J., & Clarke, J.M. 1888

Palaeontology VII. Containing descriptions and figures of the trilobites and other crustacea of the Oriskany, upper Helderberg, Hamilton, Portage, Chemung and Catskill Groups. Geological Survey of New York, Natural History of New York, 7:1-236  PDF LINK

 

Mandibles of Phyllocarida - Associated with Echinocaris punctata, in the locality which has produced the greatest number of specimens, viz., Pratt's Falls, and near Pompey Center, Onondaga county, large masticatory organs have been found quite abundantly, which, judging from a general similarity to the mandibles found in situ in this species, may be regarded as undoubtedly belonging to some species of the Phyllocarida. Beecher has described and illustrated these bodies (loc. cit.), and has indicated the fact that if bearing the same proportion to the carapace as do the mandibles in E. punctata, they must have belonged either to large individuals of this species or to some gigantic species yet unknown to us.

 

IMG1.thumb.png.3b021c6ea44c25d951460e9a5868c5cb.png

 

IMG2.png.6f53476259f3c8a9b998b4e3cd7e51ce.png

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snakebite6769

00E303C4-54F0-437C-8972-D2B2C0CA45FA.thumb.jpeg.850b24d6d4ea48125d281c5c314881e0.jpeg

Here it is Tim, sure looks phyllocarid to me 

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mcgcsp

definitely phyllocarid telson

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