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MarielleK

Inclusion in burmite amber possible relative of Melittosphex burmensis

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MarielleK

Hello all. So I recently obtained a new specimen in burmite amber from Mayanmar that I think is particularly interesting. It appears to be some species of early bee. This amber is thought to be from the Cretaceous period which is when bees evolved (in the later half) alongside flowering plants. I found an interesting article that describes one of the earliest bees Melittosphex burmensis. This insect had characteristics of both wasps and bees, and was covered in branched hairs, which is a key characteristic of pollen spreading bees. I researched this species and found that my specimen didn't look quite like the one described, but I believe may be a different species that evolved during that time. I have attached photos of my specimen as well as the article referenced and one other resource. The first photo is the dorsal view. The second photo shows hairs on the legs of the insect. Let me know what you guys think!

 

link to article: https://today.oregonstate.edu/archives/2006/oct/research-discovers-oldest-bee-key-evolution-flowering-plants

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259887593_Morphology_Classification_and_Antiquity_of_Melittosphex_burmensis_Apoidea_Melittosphecidae_and_Implications_for_Early_Bee_Evolution

 

 

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JarrodB

That's very cool. 

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Fossildude19

@MarielleK

 

Are you asking for an ID of the Bee?

Moved to Fossil ID;) 

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MarielleK

@Fossildude19 I just wanted some other peoples thoughts on wether or not this specimen could be a relative of melittosphex burmensis or possibly a new species, and its ties to bee evolution in the Cretaceous. 

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DPS Ammonite
4 minutes ago, MarielleK said:

@Fossildude19 I just wanted some other peoples thoughts on wether or not this specimen could be a relative of melittosphex burmensis or possibly a new species, and its ties to bee evolution in the Cretaceous. 

Here is what I would do; look for the authors of recent papers on Cretaceous bees from Burma. Send a photo of your bee to one or more authors. With luck, you might have a new species worthy of a paper.

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MarielleK
16 minutes ago, DPS Ammonite said:

Here is what I would do; look for the authors of recent papers on Cretaceous bees from Burma. Send a photo of your bee to one or more authors. With luck, you might have a new species worthy of a paper.

Unfortunately I did not get any paperwork along with the fossil from the seller (miner from Burma selling out of China). Would I need anything like that for it to be the subject of research? 

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DPS Ammonite

Maybe one of our members can find a copy of this recent paper which is an overview of wasps, bees and ants found in Burmite.

 

Contact the lead author and hope that they speak or can translate English.

 

“Hymenoptera (wasps, bees and ants) in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber: A review of the fauna”.

Proceedings of the Geologists' Association Volume 129, Issue 6, December 2018, Pages 736-747

 

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0016787818301044?via%3Dihub

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