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April 2019 - Finds of the Month Entries


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Fossildude19

REMINDER: PLEASE carefully read ALL of the rules below.

Make sure you include all the required information, IN THE REQUESTED FORMAT (below) when you submit your fossil! 

If you have a question about a possible entry, please send me a PM.


Please pay special attention to Rule #5: 

Before and After Preparation Photos must be submitted for prepped specimens NOT  found during the Month of the Contest.

In addition to keeping the contest fair, this new qualification will encourage better documentation of our spectacular past finds.


Entries will be taken until 11:59:00 PM EDT on APRIL 30, 2019

Any fossil submitted after that time, even if the thread is still open, will be deemed ineligible! 

 

Only entries posted with CLEAR photos and that meet the other guidelines will be placed into the Poll. 

Photos of the winning specimens may be posted to TFF's Facebook page.

 

Please let us know if you have any questions, and thanks for sharing more of your fossils and research this month.

 

Shortly after the end of the Month, separate Polls will be created for the Vertebrate and Invertebrate/Plant Find of the Month.

 

In addition to the fun of a contest, we also want to learn more about the fossils. 

Tell us more about your fossil, and why you think it is worthy of the honor. 


To view the Winning Fossils from past contests visit the Find Of The Month Winner's Gallery.

 

Now, go find your fossil, do your research, and make an entry!
Best of success to all, and good hunting!

 

***********************************


Rules for The Fossil Forum's Vertebrate and Invertebrate/Plant Find of the Month Contests

  1. Find a great Vertebrate Fossil or Invertebrate/Plant Fossil! Only fossils found personally by you are allowed. NO PURCHASED FOSSILS.
  2. Post your entry in the Find of the Month topic. Use a separate post for each entry. (Only two entries per member per contest category.)
  3. Your fossil must have been found during the Month of the Contest, or Significant Preparation * of your fossil must have been completed during the Month of the Contest.
  4. You must include the Date of Discovery (when found in the contest month); or the Date of Preparation Completion and Date of Discovery (if not found in the contest month).
  5. Before and After Preparation photos must be submitted for prepped specimens not found during the Month of the Contest. Please make sure you arrange for photos if someone else is preparing your fossil find and completes the prep requirements in the contest month.
  6. You must include the Common and/or Scientific Name.
  7. You must include the Geologic Age or Geologic Formation where the fossil was found.
  8. You must include the State, Province, or region where the fossil was found.
  9. You must include CLEAR, cropped, well-lit images (maximum 4 images). If you are proud enough of your fossil to submit it for FOTM, spend some time to take good photos to show off your fossil.
  10. Play fair and honest. No bought fossils. No false claims.

 

* Significant Preparation = Substantial work to reveal and/or repair important diagnostic features, resulting in a dramatic change in the look of the fossil. The qualification of Significant Preparation is decided at the discretion of staff. Any doubts as to the eligibility of the entry will be discussed directly with the entrant.

 

******* Please use the following format for the required information: *******

Date of Discovery

Scientific and/or Common Name

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation

State, Province, or Region Found

Photos of Find (Please limit to 4 clear, cropped, and well-lit images.)

(If prepped, before and after photos are required, please.)

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

Good evening guys, I have two scientifically important fossil finds of vertebrates to show.

The first is median spine of very primitive sarcopterygian found in detritic limestone, Silurian sarcopterygians are still known only in China! 

 

Date of finding: 02. 04. 2019

Median spine of Psarolepis- related osteichthyan

Age: Pridoli stage, Late Silurian (Kaugatuma- Ohesaare formations)

Location: Juodikiai quarry, Klaipeda district, western Lithuania 

psarolepis relative. fin spine.jpg

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

The second scientifically important find of vertebrate is lungfish tooth similar to Ichnomylax. Ichnomylax is determined as dipnorhynchid dipnoan and it is known in Early Devonian but it is believed that dipnorhynchids could survive until the end of Devonian period and this find is from Skaistgirys quarry outcrops that date back to Zagare stage (Late Famennian, the end of Devonian)! So we have the important find of the last dipnorhynchid lungfish survivor :)

 

Date of finding: 03.04.2019

Dental plate of Ichnomylax- related dipnorhynchid lungfish 

Location: Skaistgirys quarry, Joniskis district, Northern Lithuania

Age: Zagare formation, Late Famennian (the end of Devonian)

 

stomiahykidae tooth 5.jpg

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

The first invertebrate find in Early Carboniferous erratic boulder of Lithuania. Carboniferous erratic boulders previously were not determined in my area! :)

 

Date of finding: 02. 04. 2019

Unispirifer sp. brachiopod

Age: Tournaisian (Lowermost Carboniferous)

Location: Juodikiai quarry, Klaipeda district, Western Lithuania.

 

possible spirifer.JPG

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

The second Carboniferous brachiopod found in Lithuania. 

 

Angiospirifer sp. brachiopod

Age: Tournaisian, Lowermost Carboniferous

Date of finding: 02. 04. 2019

Location: Juodikiai quarry, Klaipeda district, Western Lithuania.

spiriferida 8.JPG

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Tidgy's Dad

Nice brachs! :)

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@D.N.FossilmanLithuania

It would be informative to state the size in your entries, and/or show the entire rock containing the fossil (as in your last entry).  ;)

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fossil_sea_urchin

Fossil Wood with pyrite 23cm.

Compton Bay, Isle of Wight, England

02.04.19

Gault Clay Formation

 

 

IMG_2448.thumb.jpeg.4604d55ea991dc9f4c508edb85b99b8b.jpeg

 

IMG_2447.thumb.jpeg.f207d83df240c1ebf6283f0f8114f3e0.jpeg

 

 

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania
21 hours ago, JohnJ said:

@D.N.FossilmanLithuania

It would be informative to state the size in your entries, and/or show the entire rock containing the fossil (as in your last entry).  ;)

Dear JohnJ, 

Of course it is possible to make pictures of fossils with matrix but the complete matrix fragment cannot be photographed by my microscope. 

The other thing is that taking simple pictures by camera the vertebrate pieces would be small and poorly visible.

But I can tell the size of vertebrate fragments I found. The Ichnomylax related tooth is 9 mm length, the partial median spine of "psarolepidid" sarcopterygian is 7 mm length. The dipnorhynchid is found in hard yellowish dolomite, the median spine is found in greenish grey detritic limestone, there some brachiopod and Loxonema- like fragments are visible. :)

 

Regards

Domas  

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2 hours ago, D.N.FossilmanLithuania said:

Dear JohnJ, 

Of course it is possible to make pictures of fossils with matrix but the complete matrix fragment cannot be photographed by my microscope. 

The other thing is that taking simple pictures by camera the vertebrate pieces would be small and poorly visible.

But I can tell the size of vertebrate fragments I found. The Ichnomylax related tooth is 9 mm length, the partial median spine of "psarolepidid" sarcopterygian is 7 mm length. The dipnorhynchid is found in hard yellowish dolomite, the median spine is found in greenish grey detritic limestone, there some brachiopod and Loxonema- like fragments are visible. :)

 

Regards

Domas  

Understood.  However, specimens that small would still be visible in an "overview" photo.  The purpose of that photo is not to show detail, but to illustrate the scale and context...something to consider in the future.  Thanks.  ;)

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30.3.19

 

ichthyosaur Indet. 2cm tooth with jaw bone. Jaw bone size unknown.

 

Aust Cliff, Gloucestershire, England

 

Triassic

unprepped

 

7EE6DDA1-8EB7-4F69-942E-E59C0EF863C7.jpeg

A97C872D-AA56-476D-90FB-020E0D6AD267.jpeg

D0625D9F-D6E9-4979-9D8B-227C99F9348D.jpeg

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Nice! Would you mind trying again on the negative impression image?  The camera does not seem like it found focus on that image.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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13 hours ago, digit said:

Nice! Would you mind trying again on the negative impression image?  The camera does not seem like it found focus on that image.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Will try later but not able to at the moment

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fossil_sea_urchin
On 4/5/2019 at 8:05 AM, fossil_sea_urchin said:

Fossil Wood with pyrite 23cm.

Compton Bay, Isle of Wight, England

02.04.19

Gault Clay Formation

IMG_2447.jpeg  IMG_2448.jpeg

I chose this because, despite finding dozens of bits of fossilised wood, this was the only one that had such a golden shiny appearance and it was the largest.

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IFOTM

Found - Apr 12

North Sulphur River Texas

Ozan Formation

Cretaceous - 84 - 71 Ma

Pachydiscus Ammonite With Bonus Inoceramid

 

57059773_10211844671792705_925258993486528512_n.jpg

57485991_10211844671552699_7099394826470162432_n.jpg

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VFOTM

Found Apr 15

Mosasaur Pterygoid

Ozan Formation

North Sulphur River Texas

Ozan Formation

Cretaceous - 84 - 71 Ma

56970867_10211861791580689_879837592617484288_n.jpg

57194578_10211861790900672_4680655784382562304_n.jpg

57486155_10211861790660666_766260992110755840_n.jpg

57096933_10211861790180654_7083678076550250496_n.jpg

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@JarrodB you sure that's not part of a pterygoid?  

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You are correct. I fixed it. 

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Manticocerasman

my entry from this month, something you very rarely see in the Devonian of Belgium.

It took me awhile to realise what it was.

 

Nahecaris frankei (phyllocarid )

Emsian ( early Devonian )

area of Burg-Reuland  - Belgium

found on 12 april 2019

 

IMG_3421.thumb.JPG.51e26fbcbcc5f1ff3cbaa4828dabf2c2.JPGIMG_3418.thumb.JPG.f221f8999f89cb801a795057e79e1bec.JPGIMG_3415.thumb.JPG.ff56d7466c01c2f68c702d0c2cbe58a2.JPG

 

 

the critter looked like this:

dilo1.jpg.93a2db8a5eee5d3dffa57ae813d2998f.jpg

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Entry:  Invertebrate Fossil of the Month

Taxon:  cf. Bethanyphullum sp. (Cnidaria; Anthozoa; Rugosa)

Location:  Paulding, OH

Stratigraphic Unit:  Silica Shale Formation

Geologic Age:  Middle Devonian: Erian

Date Found:  April 2, 2019

Date Preparation Completed: April 16, 2019

 

Photograph as found:

20190408_231426.thumb.jpg.4e966db524e2ff1310b1129f0638c726.jpg

 

Photograph after preparation:

5cb62c8488b93_RuguseCoralAssociation1.thumb.png.096f72ffbff729d42b103b315dcd6eb1.png

 

Comments:  This is an association of three, unusually large (well above average for the site) rugosan corals (cf. Bethanyphyllum sp.).  The middle one is about 7 inches (18 cm) in length. There are multiple epizoans attached.  The individual to the left has a colony of bryozoans, and the individual on the far right, near the calyx, has several coralites of Aulopora microbuccinata.  The rear side of the the coral on the far left has an Orthospirifer cooperi brachiopod valve "attached" (not pictured).  Of all the fossils I have found / excavated, including dinosaurs, this is one of my absolute favorites.  I have never found such an aesthetically pleasing association of horn corals as this (note:  they are oriented parallel to the bedding plane, but I prepped them as a pedestal to appear to be in an upright, growth-habit position).

 

 

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Entry:  Vertebrate Fossil of the Month

Taxon:  Unidentified Placoderm (armored fish)

Element:  Interior surface of cranial plate

Location:  Paulding, OH

Stratigraphic Unit:  Silica Shale Formation

Geologic Age:  Middle Devonian: Erian

Date Found:  April 2, 2019

Date Preparation Completed: April 3, 2019

 

Photograph as found:

20190402_201038.jpg.c77456c7025b932f5b4741c03706ea71.jpg

 

Photograph after preparation:

20190403_145749.thumb.jpg.dcb607c363745b107565676b5492e6c6.jpg

 

Comments:  I regularly find nondescript bits of fish armor at this site, but this is the first identifiable element I have ever found there.

 

For reference:

 

Screenshot_20190404-011418_Chrome.jpg.35448c23f357f33b8ac6a17368ef134e.jpg

 

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20.04.19

I present you here a section of a very large ammonite. My first guess would be Titanites because of its sheer size. Quite a pain to lug around:P.

Found in West Weare, Isle of Portland, UK

Jurassic in age and Kimmeridge Clay.

It measures 76cm around the outer curve.

 

6D2C9366-7FF5-4185-BA88-C90FC0CB573A.jpeg

E89528FC-025A-4525-9BC7-1A4F7BED4C66.jpeg

BEC77943-AE23-4A23-B846-46427C76275F.jpeg

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On 4/16/2019 at 3:39 PM, Peat Burns said:

Photograph after preparation:

5cb62c8488b93_RuguseCoralAssociation1.thumb.png.096f72ffbff729d42b103b315dcd6eb1.png

Love the prep work on this Tony.

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6 hours ago, Nimravis said:

Love the prep work on this Tony.

Thanks, Ralph!

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Couldn't pick between the two so I decided to upload both! :P

 

Invertebrate Entry 1 - Sinespinaspis markhami

Size: 1.5cm from head to tail

Location: Cotton Hill Quarry, NSW, Australia

Formation: Cotton Formation, 435 million years old

Date Collected: April 19, 2019

DSCN5933.JPG

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