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PaulK

Fossils from Tully, NY

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PaulK

Hello everyone, I'm hoping someone can help out with identifying which fossils were found during our trip to Tully, NY a week ago. I'm also hoping someone can recommend a good book for fossil identification?

 

The first fossil I'm pretty sure is a crinoid stem. I don't know if it's possible to identify what kind of crinoid just by looking at a stem from one.

 

Fossil one, approximately 1 inch in length.

 

crinoid_stem1.thumb.jpg.f9184853a188f5697227b73a9c80d4e4.jpg

 

Fossil two, approximately 1 3/4 inch wide. I have no idea what this is.

 

unknown1.thumb.jpg.eb54908f76b5b02492e1d55abbf8dd75.jpg

 

Fossil three, approximately 2 inches long. I have no idea what this one is either.

 

unknown2.thumb.jpg.1103038eeefee639f19f3ace726b3bf4.jpg

 

Fossil four, approximately 1 1/2 inch wide. I know it's shell but I would like to know which kind of shell. I apologize for the image quality.

 

unknown3.thumb.jpg.284dbdf8b7922bf37e4ffd7a5173d31f.jpg

 

Fossil five, approximately 1/4 of an inch wide. I'm absolutely clueless as to what this could be.

 

unknown4.thumb.jpg.91111a69b33e3ff4716c00c15e70cdca.jpg

 

 

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ynot

1 crinoid columnal.

2 cross section of bryozoan.

3 trace fossil - burrow cast.

4 is brachiopods.

5 another crinoid columnal. (end view.)

Nice finds!

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Rockwood

1 crinoid stem section Ligaments hold the columnals together long enough for them to fossilize in articulation 

2 tabulate coral The little ridges of protrusions along the columns being pores between the coralites.

3 trace Otherwise known as an ichno fossil.

4 see above ynot

5 see above ynot 

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ynot
19 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

2 tabulate coral The little ridges of protrusions along the columns being pores between the coralites.

Aren't the pores rather small for a coral?

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Al Tahan

Take a look at Carl Wilson’s “a field guide to Devonian paleontology in New York”

 

robert linsley has a book on Devonian paleontology as well but Carl Wilson’s is more updated. 

 

You wont find very many good sources for Cronoid ID 

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Al Tahan

Where in Tilly did you find these? Do you know what formation you may have been in?

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Rockwood
42 minutes ago, ynot said:

pores

If you are referring to the putative coralites I don't think so. 1 3/4 inches is about 45 milimeters.

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PaulK
29 minutes ago, Al Tahan said:

Where in Tilly did you find these? Do you know what formation you may have been in?

They were found in Tully, NY behind the hotel where I81 crosses state route 80 (exit 14 on I81).

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ynot
29 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

If you are referring to the putative coralites I don't think so. 1 3/4 inches is about 45 milimeters.

At least I didn't say "poors".:P

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Rockwood
8 minutes ago, ynot said:

At least I didn't say "poors".:P

What's the count on the number of times that I have ? :)

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Fossildude19

This website is a good source for ID's.

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Al Tahan
29 minutes ago, PaulK said:

They were found in Tully, NY behind the hotel where I81 crosses state route 80 (exit 14 on I81).

Thanks!! 

 

And thanks @Jeffrey P !! 

 

I think I know what location that is....big huge hill with talus all over?

 

perhaps I’ll visit it someday 

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Rockwood

@PaulK In an end view, or cross section, are the shapes circular or polygonal (pentaganal) ?

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PaulK
6 hours ago, Al Tahan said:

I think I know what location that is....big huge hill with talus all over?

Yes, it is the same hill in the link that Fossildude19 provided. My wife and I went back again today and were the only people there.

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PaulK
6 hours ago, Rockwood said:

@PaulK In an end view, or cross section, are the shapes circular or polygonal (pentaganal) ?

@Rockwood In an end view the shape is circular, there is no cross section to view. We went back to Tully again today and I found to pieces of what looks like coral to me. Both pieces of coral(?) seem to have the same texture around outer portion of fossil. 

 

The first fossil is approximately 3 inches in length.

 

coral1.thumb.jpg.4ca283f98added0017b8302059b4ff3b.jpg

 

coral2.thumb.jpg.cdf91935b53f87ab2a0dcf4fe45cc648.jpg

 

coral3.thumb.jpg.42a7d893e43fc5d305dd8414763c5a17.jpg

 

The second fossil is approximately 2 inches in length.

 

coral4.thumb.jpg.f240d80cad59cfc8fbe6ec27386c1e07.jpg

 

coral5.thumb.jpg.5a8a8c87c36872439897728f643545db.jpg

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PaulK

Thank you to everyone who replied to this thread, you answers have been very helpful.

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minnbuckeye
9 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

#4 looks like a spiriferid brachiopod, probably Mucrospirifer mucronatus.

 

Looking at this spirifer, it seems like you could place a drywall screw (not a nail) at the interface of the fossil and the matrix on the right side and tap it.  Then  the matrix should separate from the from the wing of the brachiopod. It will likely reveal a nice tip. Even looking at the crinoid in the first picture, further exposure might be possible with this easy technique.

 

 Happy hunting,

Mike

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Rockwood
37 minutes ago, PaulK said:

In an end view the shape is circular,

That and the new photos show clearly that they are bryozoans.

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PaulK
39 minutes ago, minnbuckeye said:

 

Looking at this spirifer, it seems like you could place a drywall screw (not a nail) at the interface of the fossil and the matrix on the right side and tap it.  Then  the matrix should separate from the from the wing of the brachiopod. It will likely reveal a nice tip. Even looking at the crinoid in the first picture, further exposure might be possible with this easy technique.

 

 Happy hunting,

Mike

Thank you, minnbuckeye. I would have never thought of using a drywall screw to remove some of that stuff.

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minnbuckeye

Someone once told me to NOT use a nail and told me why. But I can not remember the reasoning. Just  head this advice. It makes a big difference when prepping fossils low budget!!

 

Mike

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erose

Scale is always important in photos. The confusion sometimes between corals and bryozoans is a good example. The zooids of bryozoa are never bigger than a fraction of a millimeter, while the individual corallites of a colonial coral will be a millimeter or bigger. The only exception I know is the enigmatic Tetradium from the Upper Ordovician and it is possibly neither a coral or a bryozoan. 

 

The specimens in the photos are most definitely bryozoans. 

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ynot
5 hours ago, Rockwood said:

That and the new photos show clearly that they are bryozoans.

Yay!

I finally got one right!:P

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