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Aislin

Strange Tooth?

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Aislin

Found these on Solomon’s Island in MD. I’m bad at identifying these, but I’m pretty sure the one on the right is snaggletooth? The arrow looking one is throwing me for a loop though. Anyone think they can help? I’ve included the front and back of the arrow shaped one. 

799AE1D4-7766-4BA7-8972-C552333C7560.jpeg

304F6626-1EB3-43E5-9DD2-70E37A92C2F7.jpeg

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Darktooth

Snaggletooth and Ray plate.

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Aislin
7 minutes ago, Darktooth said:

Snaggletooth and Ray plate.

Thank you! 

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Darktooth
19 minutes ago, Aislin said:

Thank you! 

You are welcome. Also Welcome to the forum from New York!

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Tidgy's Dad

Hello, and a very warm welcome to TFF from Morocco. :)

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MrR

That's interesting. I wouldn't have figured the tooth-tooth (as opposed to grinding/crushing plate) was from a hemipristis. Are the serrations worn off or did they never exist? Is it a lower, as opposed to what seem to be the more commonly ID'd that are hook shaped (Uppers?) with large serrations that don't go to the tip? Are location and basic shape the best diagnostics? Thanks.

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xxxhalsteren
7 hours ago, MrR said:

That's interesting. I wouldn't have figured the tooth-tooth (as opposed to grinding/crushing plate) was from a hemipristis. Are the serrations worn off or did they never exist? Is it a lower, as opposed to what seem to be the more commonly ID'd that are hook shaped (Uppers?) with large serrations that don't go to the tip? Are location and basic shape the best diagnostics? Thanks.

Some lower tooth don't have the serrations. 

snaggletooth_shark_teeth.jpg

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FossilsAnonymous
8 hours ago, MrR said:

That's interesting. I wouldn't have figured the tooth-tooth (as opposed to grinding/crushing plate) was from a hemipristis. Are the serrations worn off or did they never exist? Is it a lower, as opposed to what seem to be the more commonly ID'd that are hook shaped (Uppers?) with large serrations that don't go to the tip? Are location and basic shape the best diagnostics? Thanks.

You just have to go with the overall shape. Remember, a lot of teeth here get battered and rolled around in the surf a lot. It is an upper situated towards the centere of the jaw.

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MarcoSr

The ray tooth is from an Aetobatus (pelagic eagle ray) lower dental plate and you can see other fossil examples in Walt's link posted above.

 

Marco Sr.

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Troodon

Its a lower and they are not serrated like the uppers

 

Screenshot_20190409-041015.thumb.jpg.4bb01b6994c6518835a6f58baeb86cd5.jpg

Photo from elasmo.com

 

 

@MrR   @FossilsAnonymous

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minnbuckeye
9 hours ago, MrR said:

That's interesting. I wouldn't have figured the tooth-tooth (as opposed to grinding/crushing plate) was from a hemipristis. Are the serrations worn off or did they never exist? Is it a lower, as opposed to what seem to be the more commonly ID'd that are hook shaped (Uppers?) tip? DSC_0927-002.thumb.JPG.fa9f3211925b78d7fe9784802c6e1d77.JPG

Here are a couple I found in Florida a few weeks ago. It always amazes me how different the upper vs lower teeth are for Hemipristis sharks. Yours does appear a bit water worn but stilla great find!!

 

Mike

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MrR

Thanks, all, for answering my question. There's sure a lot to know. Congratulations to the finder of the pre-owned snaggle-tooth tooth.  Cheers.

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