Jump to content
minnbuckeye

Florida teeth, bone, and vertebrae

Recommended Posts

minnbuckeye

I have had the delight of hunting the Peace river and it's Tributaries for a few years now. Time was taken to combine my finds and I discovered some unknowns that I hope someone can help me with!!  

 

 Rib. It does not appear to be Dugong. Any chance of a broad classification??

2019-04-022.thumb.jpg.681cd6e39e6009db593f87d15fca3231.jpg

 

 

These look like bullas, but so different than whales. I was told horse. Could this be correct??

2019-04-023.thumb.jpg.9a2b48894bb0238d662f2d51a19b4323.jpg

 

 

  Unknown Teeth:

2019-04-024.thumb.jpg.bfd47fb528beb818f13b79c259a95cd8.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
minnbuckeye

Unknown small vertebrae:

2019-04-025.thumb.jpg.47e1952d04213da69f7dc3084636a484.jpg 

 

 I find these all the time and have no clue as to what they are. Stingray barbs worn down is my thought. Probably for the junk pile!

 2019-04-026.thumb.jpg.77dc3738b988c02e17b4ff7d40b75597.jpg 

 

 

 

 Here is a selection of teeth that were never identified:

2019-04-027.thumb.jpg.f1d5259fe67446185d845e144c6c10d0.jpg 

 

 

I posted this in my Florida trip section and was told probably not anything. SO, I hit it with a hammer and think it IS something!

 

 

 

 2019-04-028.thumb.jpg.2d88803b68ff2e47ffebff7e6c2d0959.jpg

 

 

 Final unknown. It appears to have "enamel". Just beat up, and not from my hammer.

2019-04-029.thumb.jpg.775dd524384f0cc795697d5d4006e99e.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bronzviking

3.) looks like a lower camel tooth. 12.) Looks like a broke something, Lol. Had a claw shape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hemipristis

#7 are fragments of stingray barbs. #8,9 and 11 are fish teeth.  #11 is barracuda. #8 could be barracuda or wahoo.

 

I agree with you on #2, they look like bullas to me too

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jcbshark

I think 12 is a piece of mammoth or mastodon tooth Mike:)8,9 and 11 are cuda teeth but not sure on 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
minnbuckeye

I contacted the U of Florida expert, Hulbert,Richard C,JR  for ID help. His IDs are  

     1. Juvenile Dugong rib

     2.All are petrosals (bullas or inner ear bones). The  left one is bison. The right 2 are horse. Very good  @Shellseeker at calling these horse!!

     3. Is Llama lower tooth. Most likely Palaeolama mircifica.

     5. Is broken bison tooth.

     6. My favorite to get IDed. It is a bird vertebrae!!!!!

     12. A piece of mammoth tooth. Very good @jcbshark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shellseeker
34 minutes ago, minnbuckeye said:

2.All are petrosals (bullas or inner ear bones). The  left one is bison. The right 2 are horse. Very good  @Shellseeker at calling these horse!!

 

:yay-smiley-1::yay-smiley-1: Well, Mike.  Richard Hulbert identified some of my unknown earbones as Equus a couple of years back. The reason for celebration is Richard identifying BISON earbones.. As far as I know a first.

38 minutes ago, minnbuckeye said:

  6. My favorite to get IDed. It is a bird vertebrae!!!!!

That a BIG bird... 1 inch vertebrae... Did Richard help with which bird?  Maybe @Auspex can help...

Nice progress Mike,  Good job!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
minnbuckeye
9 hours ago, Shellseeker said:

BISON earbones

 

@Shellseeker I don't know how important earbones are to you, but if you would like it, I can send it to you. Not sure if I truly found it anyways, or whether someone threw it into my screen.

 

 Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shellseeker

Thanks Mike, but I believe you should keep this one. It is good to have some rarer examples in your Florida Fossil collection.  What I am really interested in is knowledge and the dissemination of knowledge of mammal ear bones.  i.e I want to collect your excellent photos. We are becoming world_wide experts in Florida fossil ear_bones. :fistbump:

Here is one found and identified:

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/9189-inner-ear-but-whose/

and another one from the net:

https://www.fossilera.com/fossils/2-4-fossil-manatee-ear-bone

another I found:

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/83908-large-mammal-earbone/

and finally, one I found this week... smaller and as yet unidentified.

IMG_5660.thumb.jpg.0645f0373c3b33d97679e5d1be1df980.jpgIMG_5661.thumb.jpg.28e0ecae8bea68423f07a07b0d0e71a1.jpgIMG_5663.thumb.jpg.d75977e75617a88305ee52354a5bcb44.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auspex
13 hours ago, Shellseeker said:

That a BIG bird... 1 inch vertebrae... Did Richard help with which bird?  Maybe @Auspex can help...

Non-passerine cervical, kinda' turkey-sized. Someone with a reference collection could probably figure it out, but that's all I got.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit

Possibly, from something like the copious Turkey Vultures we see on the river? Las two times we were out at the Peace, we had both Turkey Vultures and Black Vultures fly down to the banks near where we were sifting in the river and hop down to the water's edge to grab a drink. There were miles of river where they could do that and I wondered at their apparent amiability to quench their thirsts mere feet from where we were.

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auspex
18 minutes ago, digit said:

Possibly, from something like the copious Turkey Vultures we see on the river? Las two times we were out at the Peace, we had both Turkey Vultures and Black Vultures fly down to the banks near where we were sifting in the river and hop down to the water's edge to grab a drink. There were miles of river where they could do that and I wondered at their apparent amiability to quench their thirsts mere feet from where we were.

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

What was the paleoenvironment then in the area of what is now the Peace River?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit

That's the fun thing about the Peace--it varied incredibly. The flat plain that is southern Florida has been (over the millenia) a shallow coastal sea, an Everglades-like swamp, or high and dry with a mixture of grassy plain and forest. The river (in flood stage) cuts through all of these various cake layers and deposits a jumbled aggregation of fossils into the gravel beds we hunt. For this reason, it is possible to pull a dugong rib or shark tooth (marine), turtle shell frag or gator tooth/osteoderm (wetland) or horse, camelid, mammoth/mastodon tooth (terrestrial) from the very same sifting screen. :)

 

In many cases the Plio/Pleistocene fossils we pull from the Peace are not very different from the animals inhabiting the area presently (turtle, gator, muskrat, possum, raccoon, deer). Makes it tricky on occasion to determine if some items are fossilized or modern. Pretty easy with items like camelids, bison, mammoth/mastodon but less certain for gator and turtle which we see daily on the river banks.

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
minnbuckeye
51 minutes ago, digit said:

Turkey Vultures and Black Vultures

@digit, lets think more positive than vulture. And besides, it does NOT stink. I am sure it would still carry an odor millions of years out!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×