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hemipristis

McKittrick bird limb bones....but from what?

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hemipristis

hi all,

I got these as part of a collection. The ID card simply said "bird bone" from the Rancho LaBrea Fm, McKittrick.  Honestly, birds are not my forte, but I'm trying, given all the bird material that I have collected from Lee Creek. But I digress...

 

I could use some help with the ID of 4 bones.  The two here are long limb bones, approximately 3.5in to 4in in length. As for an ID, that's all I can guess.

 

Help!

thanks!

4.jpg

5.jpg

6.jpg

7.jpg

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Fossildude19

@Auspex   @Boesse    @jpc

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Auspex

Are there 4 pictured, or two? Also, please give actual measurements.

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SailingAlongToo

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siteseer

A friend has a collection of McKittrick bones and sometimes I help him sort through it and clean specimens.  He hopes for eagle and condor material but a lot of it is smaller stuff which is poorly documented other than as entries in a faunal list.  It appears no one has studied the small birds of the tar pits in any detail but a bird specialist like Auspex can help as long as he has accurate measurements.  Somewhere, there is a Ph.D dissertation or Master's Thesis from the 30's, I think, about McKittrick.  I can't find it now but you might poke around the web and track it down - can't recall the author at the moment.

 

The Lee Creek volume that covers birds might help but you find a lot of marine birds there.  McKittrick was, as it is now, an inland area with freshwater at the time.  it's just drier today than then.

 

https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/2006

 

You might also inquire on the progress of this project which should be done by now.

 

https://ucmp.berkeley.edu/about/ucmpnews/14_09/tarpit14_09.php

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hemipristis
8 hours ago, siteseer said:

A friend has a collection of McKittrick bones and sometimes I help him sort through it and clean specimens.  He hopes for eagle and condor material but a lot of it is smaller stuff which is poorly documented other than as entries in a faunal list.  It appears no one has studied the small birds of the tar pits in any detail but a bird specialist like Auspex can help as long as he has accurate measurements.  Somewhere, there is a Ph.D dissertation or Master's Thesis from the 30's, I think, about McKittrick.  I can't find it now but you might poke around the web and track it down - can't recall the author at the moment.

 

The Lee Creek volume that covers birds might help but you find a lot of marine birds there.  McKittrick was, as it is now, an inland area with freshwater at the time.  it's just drier today than then.

 

https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/2006

 

You might also inquire on the progress of this project which should be done by now.

 

https://ucmp.berkeley.edu/about/ucmpnews/14_09/tarpit14_09.php

many thanks!

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hemipristis
On 4/16/2019 at 1:57 AM, Auspex said:

Are there 4 pictured, or two? Also, please give actual measurements.

Here ya go, Scale in cm.  Here are the three longbones. there are 3 photos: a full shot, and of both ends.  This is side one

Longbones A (1).jpg

Longbones A1 (1).jpg

Longbones A3 (1).jpg

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hemipristis
On 4/16/2019 at 1:57 AM, Auspex said:

Are there 4 pictured, or two? Also, please give actual measurements.

Side 2

Longbones 2 (1).jpg

Longbones 2b (1).jpg

Longbones 2a (1).jpg

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hemipristis
On 4/16/2019 at 1:57 AM, Auspex said:

Are there 4 pictured, or two? Also, please give actual measurements.

Last bone, in matrix

in matrix (1).jpg

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jpc

I have no idea on the genus/species, but the fatter of the three free bones is a bird humerus,and the one in matrix is a bird leg bone...tarsometatrsus.  The two skinnier bones look like toe bones.  Based on their length I am going to guess some wading bird. 

 

Nice stuff.

 

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