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Gizmo

Very nice, congrats! :)

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Darktooth

Great finds, Ken!:dinothumb:

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Tidgy's Dad

Interesting report, photos and finds. 

Thank you.:)

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ClearLake

Those are pretty cool looking, especially the astragalus.  Nice find!

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snolly50

The adventures continue...great account. Wishing you good luck in that house hunt. Kathy and I have vowed never to move again! However, relocating to a situation you find more attractive is certainly a worthy pursuit. I hope you happen upon a place that exceeds your every wish. 

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garyc

Very cool finds!

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jcbshark

Great finds Ken, glad you could get out :fistbump:

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minnbuckeye

Outstanding finds! That Talus Bone (astragalus) is much more ornate than a Navicular Bone!! I have a question for you about your finds. Why does Dr. Richard Hulbert not feel there is an association between the tooth and the talus bone? To find rare material from the same species close together just says an association is possible to me.

 

 Mike

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digit

Richard didn't mention anything about the bones being associated (or not). True, this is a rather rare species to find in the Peace River (a bit more common in the northern end of Florida) but it is my contention that these are not necessarily from the same individual. I dug the same spot for another 2-3 hours without turning up any additional armadillo material--not even the most common parts which are the bony osteoderm plates. If I had been able to turn up a nice cache of parts from this species, my assumption would have been that a relatively intact individual had washed out from the banks not far upstream and had been deposited (a bit jumbled up) at the site I was digging. As the pieces I found were not closely related (cranial element and limb bone) I'm being conservative and presuming this was just a happy coincidence.

 

Many years ago I was digging at a well-known large gravel bed just downstream from the Brownville Park put-in. The spot gets hit hard so you need to do a lot of prospecting to select a place to dig. Later in a busy fossil hunting season, the site looks like a bombing range with potholes and spoil piles scattered throughout the gravel bed. Each summer--like a giant Etch-A-Sketch (Télécran in France)--the river reshuffles the gravel and redistributes the spoil piles while paving over even the most ambitious of holes left by the last season's fossil hunters. The trick is to try to dig beneath the surface gravel to get to some deeper layers. This is thwarted most times by hitting a sticky gray clay layer that rarely holds any fossils but makes sifting miserable and messy. I had discovered a spot where the gravel extended down a couple of feet and avoided the dreaded clay. Within two or three screens I had pulled up a pair of bison teeth. Several more hours of working that spot revealed a few other nice items like Equus molars and glyptodont osteoderms. I had always assumed that those two bison molars had to be associated (I've not found a subsequent one in years of sifting)--the odds were just to great that they were not in some way associated!

 

I was quickly schooled on how rash assumptions like this can quickly fall apart when I was doing a volunteer dig with the FLMNH at the Thomas Farm site a few years later. Dr. Hulbert would be there managing the dig and so I brought a number of my Peace River unknowns and more interesting finds with me to get some identifications from Richard in an expedient manner that did not require taking photos and waiting for email responses. He quickly confirmed my ID that the two molars were bison (thankfully not modern cow which look similar). When I mentioned that they must be associated having found them within minutes of each other at the site he soon set me straight. He could definitively state that they were not from the same individual. He explained to me how one tooth was shorter than the other indicating one specimen was from an older individual (more worn and shorter) and the other was from a younger bison. The capper though was they were the exact same tooth position! :P

 

These days I can still hope rare finds found together may indicate an association but I hold back on assumptions till they are confirmed with additional evidence. Will not be able to get back to the Peace till probably May but I'm hoping the river continues to drop a bit before the summer rains refill it. You can bet I'll spend more time around that spot to see if any other Holmesina bits end up in my sifting screen. ;)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Plantguy

Nice report Ken. Definitely some new stuff. congrats! Regards, Chris 

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