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A toothy day on the Peace River

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Darktooth

Great report Ken! The smaller meg is really nice. Good to see that you and Tammy were able to get out and have some fun.

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Heteromorph

Lovely finds! Your reports are always a good read with some eye candy in between. Never been to Florida myself but would definitely make a visit to the Peace if I could.

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digit
7 minutes ago, Heteromorph said:

our reports are always a good read with some eye candy in between.

That's pretty much what I shoot for. :)

 

8 minutes ago, Heteromorph said:

Never been to Florida myself but would definitely make a visit to the Peace if I could.

Our fossil hunting season is much the same as the outback of Texas--winter through spring. In Texas is it so you don't spontaneously combust in the arid heat--in Florida it is because our rivers are only accessible in the "dry season" (that is when our weather is normal enough to have an actual dry season). If your plans find yourself in the South FLorida area during the cooler drier months, I hope you'll let your plans be known here so the South Florida TFF members can organize a fossil hunting trip for you. We enjoy sharing our fossil bounty. ;)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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digit
2 minutes ago, Harry Pristis said:

It's bison, Ken.

:default_faint:

 

Wow! You could knock me down with a feather! I might have suspected something like a camelid premolar or some other tooth position of a smaller mammal--bison was not even on my radar screen. Very cool--I'd never have guessed. Thanks--that made my day. :D

 

I'm assuming the little 6-cusped molar is just a small unerupted molar with a few bonus cusps I'm not used to seeing.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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HisNHersDig

Great job bud very very nice megs. Don't think ill ever find one complete lol.

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Tidgy's Dad

Nice finds and a very enjoyable report. 

Thank you. :)

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Gizmo

Very nice, congrats! :thumbsu:

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Nimravis

Great trip report and finds.

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digit
1 hour ago, HisNHersDig said:

Don't think ill ever find one complete lol.

Enjoy your hunt for your first complete meg. It won't be long (with adequate hunting effort) before you pull a beauty of a complete one out of your sifting screen. Once you are in the "meg club" your attentions will drift on to other items you have not yet found. The megs were a nice addition to the day's find and the little one has a really beautiful curve to it. Still, my trip maker for that day was the bison premolar as it is a novelty.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Monica

Beautiful meg teeth, Ken - WOW!!!

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Plantguy

Pretty nice finds Ken! 

Congrats. 

Regards, Chris 

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digit

Just looked through the rest of the take for the day. We had a good day for gator teeth with 7 of all different sizes and shapes. Several horse tooth shards but only one in decent shape. I've got a few other mystery bones as well that I'm hoping Dr. Hulbert will comment on soon.

 

The weather (and water temp) were both gloriously warm and it was not like some past times cold and numb in January/February--even in chest waders. Hunted one spot for a while where there was a 7 foot gator hanging at the surface but it kept to the opposite bank of the river and didn't seem to pay me much mind. I was a lot happier when it came back up to the surface after submerging for a spell--it was good to know it was staying put. ;)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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jcbshark

Great finds guys, that smaller meg is sweeeet  :yay-smiley-1:

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digit

Heard back from Dr. Hulbert on a few other of my unknowns. One turned out to be a partial scapula of a juvenile tortoise which makes sense it retrospect. The other was a rather globular item that likely would have been tossed back into the river except for the three facets on one side where it connected to other bones. I was assuming this might be another of those odd bones in one of the limb joints but I was way off (not entirely surprising). Turns out that piece is a partial whale bulla. This spot has given up close to a hundred cetacean tympanic bullae combined over previous visits. Mostly they have that distinctive rounded appearance that is somewhat reminiscent of the shape of a human outer ear (makes them easy to remember what they are). :)

 

The little molar cap with the 6 cusps (including the 2 little ones) looked odd to me. I assumed it was tapir as these are not highly uncommon and mostly come as rootless crowns (the teeth being usually hollow when fossilized). I can now see why this "square" tooth was not fitting into my "round" hole of a concept of tapir teeth--because it isn't! :P I like fossil finds that come with a little learning lesson attached. It turns out my odd little tooth is something novel for me (always a good thing)--it has been identified as a lower third molar of the peccary Platygonus. I should have taken the time to page through my The Fossil Vertebrates of Florida book:

 

Two genera of peccaries are recognized in the late Pliocene and Pleistocene of Florida: Platygonus and, continuing from the early Pliocene, Mylohyus.

They are readily distinguished by the structure of their cheek teeth (figs. 13.10, 13.11). The molars of Platygonus are bilophodont, whereas those of

Mylohyus are bunodont (with four main cusps and several accessory cuspules). Both upper and lower molars show these differences. The lower

premolars of Platygonus have long, narrow proportions and "stair-stepped" cusps (the front cusp being higher than the back).
In Mylohyus, the lower premolars are nearly square and have low, flat crowns.

 

P5031274.jpg     P5031273.jpg

 

It is quite obvious looking at better photos of the occlusal surface of this tooth that it is very pig-like. Perhaps, if I had put on my reading glasses when looking at this tooth--or taken better photos earlier, I'd have noticed this resemblance earlier and been thinking peccary instead of tapir. I've got quite a few tapir crowns (and a few with partial roots) but I believe this is probably my first peccary! Nothing better than finding a type of fossil that is new to you and getting a bonus lesson along the way. ;)

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Harry Pristis

 

Here is Mylohyus for comparison:

 

 

peccary_mylohyus.JPG

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digit

Ah, yes--quite different even with the significant wear. Thanks for posting.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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