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maggykuhn3

Fossilized heart

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maggykuhn3

Hi I have built a case on all the Rocks I have shown and tried to send to you.and I get shut down at every corner for answers or anything.this is a real fossil like object very light has all the right flakiness and looks like a real heart.

1557332309698411337535.jpg

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Kane

Apart from more recent mammals in permafrost, fossilization processes do not favour organ tissue preservation. It does not look like a human heart: the morphology is incorrect.

 

Perhaps a better route would be for you to identify the geology of the area in which you are making your finds, which would then indicate the likely fossils to be found. :)

 

And I’m a bit confused when you say you’ve been shut down on “all the rocks” you have shown when this is only the second one you have posted for ID.

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doushantuo

Maggykuhn3,try to think scientifically/logically:

You would have to explain the presence of a basically VERY nondurable biogenic tissue(muscle) and the absence of a far more durable material:(parts of)the skeleton.

edit: hope you will not get mad at me for saying this,but you have not made a scientific (or even legal) case for this being a fossil

 

 

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facehugger

Nope.

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JarrodB

Welcome to the forum. Sorry it's not a fossil. 

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doushantuo

i can think of two cases only:

Rhacolepis and Thescelosaurus

the case for the latter has been rebutted,I think

 

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Carl

I agree: not a fossil. Sorry.

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Mediospirifer

Not a fossil. The texture of the rock looks like a breccia to me. Every rock has a story; this one speaks of interesting geological processes, not animal life.

 

At least in my opinion.

 

Edited to add: When you say "the right flakiness to be a fossil", I have to answer: most of the fossils I've found aren't flaky, unless they're brachiopods. Some brachiopods exfoliate, these are usually shiny and look nothing like your piece.

 

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ricardo

Rocks are like clouds… we can see a lot of silhouettes on them. That is not a fossilized heart;  like this rock in my photo isn’t a fossilized partial brain. I’m sure you will find nice fossils sooner or later :d_good_luck: .IMG_0672.thumb.JPG.ee36d746313524547a25e4a9d1c3accc.JPG

 

Middle Jurassic 

Serras d'Aire e Candeeiros, Portugal

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Mark Kmiecik

There's at least thousands species of fossil animals that we know, and thousands more that have not yet been found and/or may not have ever fossilized. Which one is this? How would you know the shape of its heart? How many of them have hearts that are shaped this way? Where are the main arteries and veins that lead out from and in to the heart. Which part of this "heart" is the auricle(s) and which is the ventricle(s)? Where is the external venation? Is it mammal, reptilian, fish, etc.? What fossils have been found in the same strata as this? What strata is this from?

 

The questions above are only a small fraction of what you need to know to identify a fossil. The other thing you need to know is what does not make a fossil, which is about 50 times the amount of that which makes a fossil. You and I will never individually possess the amount of collective knowledge found among the members of this forum. It is just mathematically impossible. Your brain would explode, maybe even literally. Trust us, please, when we tell you that it is not a heart. We're not being mean or cruel. All we're saying is that ALL of the evidence says, "Nope, not a heart", and not a single, eentsy-teentsy, tiny, miniscule, infinitesimally small bit of evidence says that it could even maybe, by chance, possibly be heart.

 

P.S. -- That's not the way the majority of animal hearts are shaped. Google "pig heart", "fish heart", "reptile heart", etc., to see how many there can be.

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vellis

If you want to find fossils, I have a few tips in no particular order:

 

1) go to known fossil producing sites - google “fossil hunting Colorado” or your city

 

2) join a local paleo society, even if only to go on their field trips

 

3) start studying the geology of your local area  What geological formation are you standing in right now? Look it up. What fossils are found in that formation?  Where in that formation? Google for geologic maps of Colorado.   

 

4) post to the right forum and ask members in Colorado where local fossil sites are

 

5) read through this fossil ID section often, look at pictures and ses which are and which are not fossils.

 

if you are finding these things already in fossil producing sites, then keep looking and you will find fossils.  

 

As as far as the geology goes, it may seem overwhelming at first, but there is a VAST amount of information out there that can be very helpful.  Sometimes areas at the border of two formations can be very rewarding fossil wise.   But start with known fossil sites, get good at finding and identifying stuff and later you will be able to find things at random sites.  

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digit

You've received lots of good feedback here on what your rock is (and isn't). We suggest you seek confirmation of your believe in what this rock appears to be to you elsewhere. Since you do not choose to change your opinion based on our answers we hope you find a local paleontologist who is willing to explain to you why your rocks are what they are and not what you believe.

 

There is nothing more to learn hear. Thanks to the membership who provided useful information.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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