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Omnomosaurus

Unknown Theropod Tooth - Kem Kem

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Omnomosaurus

Here's my latest (tiny) acquisition from the Kem Kem:

 

IMG_20190514_125507882.thumb.jpg.25574e2006856948ba8995f2dfb849bb.jpg

 

Looking at the general morphology and almost 'hooked' shape of the denticles on the distal carina, I'm not sure whether this one fits more as a juvenile carcharodontosaurid, juvenile abelisaurid or would fit closer to the dromaeosaurid-like teeth described here?:

 

12542_2012_153_Fig9_HTML.jpg

 

 

Mesial midline denticle count: 9/2mm

Distal midline denticle count: 7/2mm

 

Both carinae extend to the base.

 

IMG_20190514_124137667.thumb.jpg.c211d8d70bba51d7aa07b5f2ac76514a.jpgIMG_20190514_124242498.thumb.jpg.dc81a8b67bca1dcaf177f80d0988dabb.jpg

 

Distal edge:

IMG_20190514_125901456.thumb.jpg.7731f4997466cddc985c8dc6e84830cb.jpg

 

Mesial edge:

IMG_20190514_125812906.thumb.jpg.a03835a1436bb849d2bfbe7627f49886.jpg

 

Cross section (anterior of tooth facing top):IMG_20190514_125942180.thumb.jpg.6ee947ae663b37d17484c33941b3ef28.jpg

 

Due to the strong lateral compression & apparent lack of interdental succuli, I would hedge my bets on juvie abelisaur, but those denticles are making me doubt it a bit.

 

5cdabbf7560af_IMG_20190514_1255078822.jpg.b01bbf396429aed1e61ccff13fecd40e.jpg

 

Anyone got any thoughts?

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SUPER BAT

Velociraptor or compy???

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Misha
11 minutes ago, SUPER BAT said:

Velociraptor or compy???

Those are not found in the Kem Kem

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Omnomosaurus
46 minutes ago, SUPER BAT said:

Velociraptor or compy???

 

34 minutes ago, Misha said:

Those are not found in the Kem Kem

 

Yeah, neither of these are found in the Kem Kem.

 

The closest match I could find, with a quick search, is the morphology of a Madagascan dromaeosaurid:

 

Screenshot_20180105-193121.jpg

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Troodon

Its not a Dromaeosaurid since the serration density of both edges looks pretty similar.  You labial and lingual views of the tooth have the serrations a bit blurry.  Can you try to take sharper photos.  Thanks

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SUPER BAT
57 minutes ago, Misha said:

Those are not found in the Kem Kem

Then T-rex?Image result for allosaurus skull

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gigantoraptor
12 minutes ago, SUPER BAT said:

Then T-rex?

Dinosaurs are often found in only one specific location in the world. T. rex is found in multiple, but so far only in Asia and most in North-America (That skull doesn't seem to be Tyrannosaurus by the way). If you look up the age of Tyrannosaurus you'll see it's from the Late Cretaceous, more specific the Maastrichtian. The Kem Kem beds are Cenomanian, or roughly 30 million years older.

 

The dinosaurs present in the Kem Kem beds are: Spinosaurus aegyptiacus, Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus, Sauroniops pachytholus, Deltadromeus agilis, Rebbachisaurus garasbae, at least two undescribed Abelisaurids, at least one Dromaeosaurid, A titanosaurid, possibly an Ornithopod... There might be a lot more, but you can't just suggest any name that comes to mind. We need to know the location of a tooth just because that narrows the possible families/genus/species down.

There is no evidence of any Tyrannosauroid in the Kem Kem beds so far.

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Omnomosaurus
43 minutes ago, Troodon said:

Its not a Dromaeosaurid since the serration density of both edges looks pretty similar.  You labial and lingual views of the tooth have the serrations a bit blurry.  Can you try to take sharper photos.  Thanks

 

Good point on the serration density - I'm assuming the rule of distal>mesial denticles count is consistent across all dromaeosaurs?

 

Sorry Troodon, my camera isn't always the best. Here's a few more (hopefully better) shots:

 

5cdad39baea2e_IMG_20190514_1255078823.thumb.jpg.76a17c3e8026a2af139e81f1f5cd89f4.jpgIMG_20190514_152854987.thumb.jpg.9787e372f940972259daed712c7a67da.jpgIMG_20190514_151902836.thumb.jpg.202902ed70ca4a8663cdae95b7bb0767.jpgIMG_20190514_152327428.thumb.jpg.46077fe2325d55f993b191dcaf79a18f.jpg

 

28 minutes ago, SUPER BAT said:

Then T-rex?Image result for allosaurus skull

 

As gigantoraptor said, Rex isn't/wasn't a resident of the Kem Kem either.

 

Try reading online about the kinds of dinosaurs you're interested in, where/when they lived, and how to identify fossils belonging to them. There are some fantastic guides on identifying teeth written by Troodon here on the forums, if you're specifically interested in teeth.

 

It can be a lot of information, and scientific terminology to wrap your head around in the beginning, but just keep reading, studying photos & learning where you can. We're all learning new things all the time. :)

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Misha
26 minutes ago, SUPER BAT said:

Then T-rex?Image result for allosaurus skull

Just like gigantoraptor mentioned they are not found in the Kem Kem and on top of that and the tooth doesn't match the characteristics you would expect in a Tyrannosaurus rex.

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Troodon

Thanks much better. Im leaning toward Abelisaurid on this one.  The height base ratio is although odd more like a Carch but the denticle are pointing toward the tip and the wavy edge at the base is very typical Abelisaurid not Carch.  I also think the crowns on Carch are more evenly compressed than what I am seeing here.. anyway my thoughts.  Its a very nice tooth good buy.

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Omnomosaurus
18 minutes ago, Troodon said:

Thanks much better. Im leaning toward Abelisaurid on this one.  The height base ratio is although odd more like a Carch but the denticle are pointing toward the tip and the wavy edge at the base is very typical Abelisaurid not Carch.  I also think the crowns on Carch are more evenly compressed than what I am seeing here.. anyway my thoughts.  Its a very nice tooth good buy.

 

Thanks Troodon, you're always a huge help!

 

I'll go with your expertise, and label this one Abelisaurid indet. then. I'll try to hunt down a dromaeosaur for the collection next.

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SUPER BAT
4 hours ago, gigantoraptor said:

Dinosaurs are often found in only one specific location in the world. T. rex is found in multiple, but so far only in Asia and most in North-America

Ok,thanks,just a little correction - T-rex wasn't presesnt in Asia.Fossils from the continent have been reffered to genus Tyrannosaurus in the past(as ''Tyrannosaurus'' bataar and ''Tyrannosaurus'' zhuchengensis), but not to T-rex. However, these remains were later reffered to other genera (Tarbosaurus (Rozhdestvensky 1965) and Zhuchengtyrannus (Hone 2011).

Only a few researchers like Thomas Carr still hold the opinion that these 2 genera should be lumped into Tyrannosaurus.

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Haravex

I'm also in the abelisauridae camp

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