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Cthulhu2

Creeks around Gainesville

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Cthulhu2

Hey guys. I’ve done a good bit of hunting in Gainesville and wanted to know if there were any creeks around/outside Gainesville you would suggest for fossil hunting. Seems like all the creeks in Gville are over hunted.

 

 

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SailingAlongToo

If someone tells you of a creek here in public, it too will be over hunted, VERY quickly. Lots of lurkers.

 

Download local topography maps and look for tributaries feeding into your creeks/streams as well as bridges and road cuts. Also, look for construction sites not posted with signage.

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hamman88

Looks for vacant lots or retention ponds adjacent to the creek and far from a bridge, that way you can get in without cutting through someone's yard.  Otherwise you will walk for 3 hours to get somewhere good.  This may be terrible advice, but it works.

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digit

Given the fact that a number of creeks flow right through populated areas of Gainesville, it is not surprising that they get hit with lots of hunting pressure. Many of the smaller creeks are not truly navigable waterways by any stretch of the imagination and therefore are NOT public property (allowed by your Florida Vertebrate Fossil Permit). I've been looking for a house in Gainesville and have driven over every road in the area at least twice (or so it seems) in recent months. I've looked at houses where the creek runs through the property and seen signs posted where the roads cross these creeks explicitly stating that the creek is private property and warning against trespassing. I don't think there are going to be any great untapped waterways in Gainesville and certainly they would not remain so if divulged here (and not by PM).

 

Though the commonly hunted creeks see their share of fossil hunters, good stuff can still be found there. New fossil material  (and, unfortunately, trash) is added to the creeks each year and persistence may be the key to interesting finds. I dropped off some fossils for the FLMNH collection last year and Dr. Hulbert showed me a donation they just received that came from a Gainesville creek. It was a gem quality cetacean tympanic bulla. Anybody who has found these will know that the thinner edge on the complete bulla is very delicate and quickly gets eroded away till there is only the more solid part of the body left behind to indicate its identity. This one was intact retaining the thinnest parts of the edge I'd ever seen. It was found on the surface along one bank of an unspecified creek--just sitting there waiting to be picked up. Thankfully it was--and donated too! Richard informed the person who found this item that they should go back and re-search the area as it appeared a skull must have been eroding from the bank at that spot. Haven't heard if any more had been recovered but it shows that there are still some gems to be found in the creeks.

 

Other than obtaining access to hunt on private property, I don't think any waterway in Florida exists that hasn't seen a good amount of hunting pressure--not since the 1970s.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Cthulhu2
35 minutes ago, digit said:

Given the fact that a number of creeks flow right through populated areas of Gainesville, it is not surprising that they get hit with lots of hunting pressure. Many of the smaller creeks are not truly navigable waterways by any stretch of the imagination and therefore are NOT public property (allowed by your Florida Vertebrate Fossil Permit). I've been looking for a house in Gainesville and have driven over every road in the area at least twice (or so it seems) in recent months. I've looked at houses where the creek runs through the property and seen signs posted where the roads cross these creeks explicitly stating that the creek is private property and warning against trespassing. I don't think there are going to be any great untapped waterways in Gainesville and certainly they would not remain so if divulged here (and not by PM).

 

Though the commonly hunted creeks see their share of fossil hunters, good stuff can still be found there. New fossil material  (and, unfortunately, trash) is added to the creeks each year and persistence may be the key to interesting finds. I dropped off some fossils for the FLMNH collection last year and Dr. Hulbert showed me a donation they just received that came from a Gainesville creek. It was a gem quality cetacean tympanic bulla. Anybody who has found these will know that the thinner edge on the complete bulla is very delicate and quickly gets eroded away till there is only the more solid part of the body left behind to indicate its identity. This one was intact retaining the thinnest parts of the edge I'd ever seen. It was found on the surface along one bank of an unspecified creek--just sitting there waiting to be picked up. Thankfully it was--and donated too! Richard informed the person who found this item that they should go back and re-search the area as it appeared a skull must have been eroding from the bank at that spot. Haven't heard if any more had been recovered but it shows that there are still some gems to be found in the creeks.

 

Other than obtaining access to hunt on private property, I don't think any waterway in Florida exists that hasn't seen a good amount of hunting pressure--not since the 1970s.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Thanks Ken! I appreciate the advice, makes me wonder how rare my ear bone is. 

77EE7FBE-7F8D-4DBB-88F1-FC962B320658.jpeg

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digit

That's certainly the largest I've seen from Florida. @Boesse knows cetaceans better than anybody I know and he might be able to provide an idea as to the identity of the former owner. As hands are not a standard unit of measure (despite what equestrians might think :P), can you measure the dimensions of this whopper and provide that information here?

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

P.S.: Oh, and given its size, I'd have to say Rare (with a capital 'R'). ;)

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Cthulhu2
3 hours ago, digit said:

That's certainly the largest I've seen from Florida. @Boesse knows cetaceans better than anybody I know and he might be able to provide an idea as to the identity of the former owner. As hands are not a standard unit of measure (despite what equestrians might think :P), can you measure the dimensions of this whopper and provide that information here?

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

P.S.: Oh, and given its size, I'd have to say Rare (with a capital 'R'). ;)

I just wish I didn’t snap it in half a while back :DOH: I can provide measurements when home

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digit

That's what glue is for--you can hardly see the crack. The coloration of the fossil makes it look almost modern and it doesn't seem highly permineralized.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Boesse

From the outline and size it is probably a right whale (Balaenidae) and a big one at that. Well known for quite massive earbones, and likely the largest earbones in the animal kingdom (far larger, by perhaps 20+%, than a blue whale).

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