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markjw

Spectacular fossils in Oakville, Ontario

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markjw

On the west side of the harbour in Oakville, Ontario, they have set up a waterfront with hundreds of big stones from Orillia.
They are covered with fossils...many thousands of them, and some quite striking.

 

Last I saw, it wasn't officially open, but it's accessible.

TanneryParkNautiloid.jpg

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Tidgy's Dad

Looks rather like a tentaculitid. 

How big is it? 

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Ludwigia
14 hours ago, markjw said:

On the west side of the harbour in Oakville, Ontario, they have set up a waterfront with hundreds of big stones from Orillia.
They are covered with fossils...many thousands of them, and some quite striking.

 

Last I saw, it wasn't officially open, but it's accessible.

TanneryParkNautiloid.jpg

Thanks for the info, but I'd suggest to visitors that they leave their tools at home unless they have explicit permission to use them.

 

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Wrangellian

Is that not an orthocone nautiloid/ceph/whatever you want to call it?

It's quite nice and it'd be too bad if you're not able/allowed to collect it.

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Kane
2 minutes ago, Wrangellian said:

Is that not an orthocone nautiloid/ceph/whatever you want to call it?

The ribbing is too tight for an Ordovician nautilod, methinks. Of course, it would be fabulous if the OP gave us a scale. :whistle:

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Wrangellian

Yes, but are there Tentaculites large enough to show that big in a photo taken without macro lens?

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Kane
4 minutes ago, Wrangellian said:

Yes, but are there Tentaculites large enough to show that big in a photo taken without macro lens?

Without a scale, we’re whistling dixie it seems...

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markjw

Sorry folks...it was about 20cm long. I didn't see many others with the same ridges...most were smoother. The sizes were often 12 to 25 cm.

 

Most common were big snail/gastropod things. There are whole fossilized beds of 'periwinkle' style molluscs.

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Kane

Then more likely to be a nautiloid after all! Tentaculites and cornulites are much smaller. 

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markjw

Nice grouping. The tapered nautiloid is less than a foot long.

aParkingLotFossil-13d.jpg

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markjw

No idea what this is...maybe 12 cm. Simply horn coral?

aAncientMonster4-Two-490.jpg

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markjw

I like this guy...about 20cm long.

aSeaCreature300.jpg

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JUAN EMMANUEL
On 5/20/2019 at 12:58 PM, markjw said:

Nice grouping. The tapered nautiloid is less than a foot long.

aParkingLotFossil-13d.jpg

 

On 5/20/2019 at 1:00 PM, markjw said:

No idea what this is...maybe 12 cm. Simply horn coral?

aAncientMonster4-Two-490.jpg

 

On 5/20/2019 at 1:04 PM, markjw said:

I like this guy...about 20cm long.

aSeaCreature300.jpg

I dont think these fossils originate in the  Ordovician. Oakville is mostly Queenston Formation, which is red shale with the thin bands of blue strata, and the formation is known for being practically empty in this part of Ontario. Whenever I pass Bronte Creek on the QWE/Highway 407 all I see is the red shale.

Here are some examples of the Queenston Formation exposed in Hamilton, Ontario beside a creek. 

40401256-A814-4F9B-8B39-A0437CCCEFCA.thumb.jpeg.39402e5a08d64b9e7fb73a563368781a.jpeg94D514D6-9F86-49BC-98B7-A73294DD36E7.thumb.jpeg.b9a5097334faa56252441da011c3e29e.jpeg

It is written though on W.A. Hessin’s book South Central Ontario Fossils that the Upper Member of the Georgian Bay Formation is exposed somewhere south downriver on Bronte Creek so therefore south Oakville must have the Georgian Bay Formation underlying as bedrock.

But that is something I have to check out yet and see if it is true.

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Tidgy's Dad

Well, yes, as has been said, at that ssze it can't be a tentaculitid, must be a nautiloid. 

Amazing, I have never seen an Ordovician nautiloid which such pronounced and sharp edged annulations. 

Silurian, maybe; Devonian, sure, but not in the Ordovician. 

Great find! :)

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JUAN EMMANUEL
5 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Well, yes, as has been said, at that ssze it can't be a tentaculitid, must be a nautiloid. 

Amazing, I have never seen an Ordovician nautiloid which such pronounced and sharp edged annulations. 

Silurian, maybe; Devonian, sure, but not in the Ordovician. 

Great find! :)

Wait what is Orillia’s bedrock? 0_o Anyone know?

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Wrangellian

Aha!

Very nice nautilods, whatever their age. I believe that curved thing is one also, but you'll need someone else to narrow down the names for you.

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markjw

Thanks to all, and thanks to JUAN EMMANUEL for the insight into the Queenston formation.


Although I am REALLY interested in the nature of the bedrock, in the 6 weeks I've been doing this, I've learned to not get too depressed about the barren formation in my hometown. I've found interesting things where you might not expect them to be. Additionally, the developers in the area bring the quarries to us...I made a flickr album about "Fossils in parking lots" because of the spectacular fossil-bearing rocks used for decoration and support.


I guess I should be careful as well about the Tannery Park fossils...the municipality told me that the supplier of the "Armour Stone" was in Orillia, but I suppose that they may have sourced it from somewhere outside that city.

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Tidgy's Dad

Having said I don't know of any nautiloids that fit the bill, maybe I've just found one. 

Have a look at Monomuchites, an Ordovician orthocerid that is found in Ontario and possesses these sharp, tight annulations.

 

image.thumb.png.cfdbbf4588ef016ffc04e890be27af9a.png

image.thumb.png.70164fb33fc104c2551b7e908d3c553c.png

 

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markjw

That is absolutely fabulous. Thanks for posting that rich material.

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