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Oxytropidoceras

When did Life Arrive on Land? (Organic-walled microfossils, *FUNGI* Arctic, Canada)

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FossilDAWG

Interesting.  I wonder what they fed on, as fungi are not primary producers and rely on dead or alive organic material (especially plants) as a food source.  Maybe bacterial biofilm?

 

Don

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Auspex
16 minutes ago, FossilDAWG said:

Interesting.  I wonder what they fed on, as fungi are not primary producers and rely on dead or alive organic material (especially plants) as a food source.  Maybe bacterial biofilm?

Most likely, though radiotrophic is a possibility, too.

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Auspex
1 hour ago, DPS Ammonite said:

... radiotrophic fungi that use ionizing radiation as an energy source.

Since the high end of ultraviolet is an ionizing radiation, early lifeforms on the early Earth could have evolved to take advantage of it.

An interesting thought experiment, in any case.;)

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FossilDAWG

This topic is already being discussed here.  Lets keep the discussion in one thread.

 

Don

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Fossildude19

Topics merged. ;) 

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RandyB

Thanks for the reroute @FossilDAWG

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FossilDAWG

I think Tim (Fossildude19) did the merge as I was posting.  Anyway, good end result with everything in one place.

 

Don

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Wrangellian

There is a fossil called Diskagma that is about 2.2byo and it's thought to be terrestrial, and resembles a type of fungus, but of course it's not clear what it really was. I need to find the paper on that one, but it could indicate that life on land goes back much further.

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piranha
1 hour ago, Wrangellian said:

There is a fossil called Diskagma that is about 2.2byo and it's thought to be terrestrial, and resembles a type of fungus, but of course it's not clear what it really was. I need to find the paper on that one, but it could indicate that life on land goes back much further.

 

 

Retallack, G.J., Krull, E.S., Thackray, G.D., Parkinson, D. 2013

Problematic urn-shaped fossils from a Paleoproterozoic (2.2 Ga) paleosol in South Africa.

Precambrian Research, 235:71-87  PDF LINKInterview: Oregon Public Broadcasting Radio

 

image.png.32d88a398398ab9f29ceed2a6bdccf0f.png

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Wrangellian

That's the one, thanks Scott.

I see there is mentioned/pictured an even older organism, Thucomyces, 2.8byo!

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Fossildude19

Topics merged. ;) 

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Scylla
5 hours ago, Scylla said:

Billion year old microfossil pushes back earliest chitin, earliest fungi, earliest terrestrial fossil.

 

https://interestingengineering.com/billion-year-old-fossil-fungi-push-back-records-by-over-450-million-years

 

3 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Topics merged. ;) 

My memory is slipping, I did see oxytropidoceras post earlier:DOH:

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