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Paperstraw

Hi all,

 

Found this fish fossil in some slate in Kelowna. Not sure of the rock member yet, as I'm unfamiliar with Okanagan geology (besides the White Lake member).

 

The fossil is close to a foot long, and was found along side fossils of Metasequoia occidentalis leaves as well as an unidentified deciduous branch. I imagine this is probably a fossil of Eosalmo driftwoodensis. The fossil has preserved a somewhat squished 3d rendering of the spinal/head material that is extremely fragile. Is it valuable to maintain, and if so how?

 

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RJB

If you want to save that fish, what I would do is put it onto some kind of board, ( i use dura rock, does not expand/contract like wood)  and glue it onto your substrate while at the same time glueing the fish slabs back together.  I use a thicker viscosity of super glue for the fish and silicone to glue it onto the substrate.   Heres one I did for example.  This was in 4 pieces.

 

RB

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Paperstraw

Thanks RB,

Do you think I should remove the fragile and loose spinal column material (imprint of the spinal column will still be visible below), or clesr coat it or something?

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RJB

Hard to tell from the picture, but I would stablize any lose bone material and if possible try and remove any matrix thats in the way.  Im not very good at explaining things but maybe @Ptychodus04 can do a better job at it.

 

RB

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Ptychodus04

Yes, definitely stabilize the loose bones. Get some Paraloid B-72 and dissolve it in acetone at a ratio of 1 part Paraloid to 50 parts acetone. Brush this onto the specimen to lock the bones in place. It will probably take several applications to get everything stabilized.

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Mark Kmiecik

And make sure you have REALLY, REALLY GOOD ventilation when working with acetone, preferably outdoors with some wind and you upwind of the fossil. Do not breathe acetone fumes!!!!

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Mark Kmiecik

Great specimens -- congratulations.

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Wrangellian

You've found a good location!

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Malcolmt

Outstanding

 

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Fossildude19

Sweet Fish! 

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Ludwigia

Very good! Keep at it!

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FossilDAWG

Nice fish!  I have relatives in Kelowna and spent quite a lot of time there in the past, but I never heard of any nearby fossil sites.  I wish I had known I didn't have to go all the way to Princeton to fossil hunt.

 

I assume you are familiar with Mark Wilson's work on BC Eocene fish?  Your second specimen might be an Amyzon, a member of the sucker family (Catastomidae).  The genus is common in Eocene lake bed deposits near Horsefly, and it also occurs in the Allenby Formation near Princeton.  

 

Don

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Paperstraw

Hi Don,

 

I'm not familiar with Mark Wilson's work as I'm new to the area and the fossils, but will check it out. I did take out a BC fossil guide called "Life in Rock", which has a pretty good overlay of whst you can expect to find in BC. With that book I do concur that the second fish is probably an Amyzon sp. The first fish I posted I believe is a disarticulated Eosalmo driftwoodensis. The plants I've found alongside then are Metasequoia occidentalis and Pinus latahensis (characteristic 5 needle bunch).

 

I'm in the same boat as your re: Princeton, we drove there just the day before I found the first fish to fossil hunt and got only plants, then I found this shale completely by chance 5 minutes away from my house. Princeton was noce though, and I did find some nice plants. 

 

Next up, I'm in touch with a botanist/palynologist in Vernon who might be willing to introduce me to the world of pollen microfossils...

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Paperstraw

Quick update of finds from this site. Went searching today and found lots of metasequoia. But! Also found this leaf!

 

In other news, the Royal BC Museum has emailed me back re: the fish fossils and they would like me to donate them to their permanent collection. I think I'm going to do so in exchange for replicas for both me and the Okanagan Heritage Museum. Thoughts?

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Monica
47 minutes ago, Paperstraw said:

Quick update of finds from this site. Went searching today and found lots of metasequoia. But! Also found this leaf!

 

In other news, the Royal BC Museum has emailed me back re: the fish fossils and they would like me to donate them to their permanent collection. I think I'm going to do so in exchange for replicas for both me and the Okanagan Heritage Museum. Thoughts?

 

I say do it!!!  You'll be contributing to scientific research AND you'll earn your "Paleo Partner" badge here on the forum - it's a win-win! :):dinothumb:

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Tidgy's Dad

Lovely specimens. :)

I think donating them to science and / or to be available for public viewing would be a great thing to do.

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jdp
On 5/30/2019 at 4:25 AM, Paperstraw said:

Quick update of finds from this site. Went searching today and found lots of metasequoia. But! Also found this leaf!

 

In other news, the Royal BC Museum has emailed me back re: the fish fossils and they would like me to donate them to their permanent collection. I think I'm going to do so in exchange for replicas for both me and the Okanagan Heritage Museum. Thoughts?

received_2998034346888233.jpeg

 

I'd strongly recommend this! We know very little about this age of fossils in BC and these fishes will be important in better understanding that interval. Dr. Arbour at the Royal BC Museum is pretty serious about developing BC paleo and will find someone to study these fishes promptly, as well.

 

This is exciting stuff! 

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FossilDAWG

As I mentioned before (I think) there is nothing in the published literature regarding fish-bearing Eocene lake bed deposits near Kelowna, though such deposits are known from other sites in the BC and Washington State interior.  I think these fossils could be a valuable contribution to the paleogeography/paleoecology of the BC Eocene.  In that case, they should be deposited in a museum collection to be available for research.  Ideally you could be involved in the work, and either be acknowledged or even included as an eventual author when the work is published.  Unfortunately it does not always work out that way, but you can increase the odds by taking an active role in the project.  My first publication, which was on a Pleistocene fish fauna, came about that way.

 

Don

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Paperstraw

Thanks for all the input guys! I agreed to donate the fossils, just waiting on the paperwork. 

 

Haven't found anything new of substance lately but have found some weird and mysterious things in the shale wall.

First up, not a fossil, but the shale is really ferrous and sulfurous so some pyrite crystals have formed.

 

Another weird thing I found were these 3 almost perfectly circular concretions that laid perpendicular to the bedding plane of the slate. The weird thing is that they were almost a muddy clay-like material and had an almost humus-like smell. My thoughts are that they were large parts of a tree or something. Embedded in the mud were some rock discs. Second picture attached. Wood?

 

Lastly, today I found an anomalous fossilized shape. Maybe a cone? Thoughts?

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