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JulianoLPD

Hi there everyone.


I have some pyritized ammonites I believed to be real, but now I'm having second thoughts...

The ammonoids from the picture below are both supposed to be pyrite, but why is one so much "golder" than the other?

I know it is a natural process, so not every piece will be exactly like the other, but my ammonites are all like the first one, bright gold, and they are all from the same seller. I just wanted to know if they are real. I mean, if that's their real color or if they are treated somehow or painted, etc...

Thanks in advance!

IMG_20190528_113524.jpg

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Manticocerasman

don't worry, like Tim said, the preservation conditions can change the aspect of the pyrite fossils.

they ar both real.

 

FYI, the ammonite on the right looks like a Kosmoceras to me.

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caldigger

I purchased one with a  bright golden shine from Poland, it was a bit duller by the time it got here and within a few weeks was a dark bronze. Eventually it will likely turn black like the one on your left. 

Perhaps the golden color fades away when exposed to the air for a length of time.

20190602_121805.jpg

20190602_121823.jpg

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JulianoLPD

Thank you, guys!

Yes, Caldigger! It is supposed to be Kosmoceras proniae from Russia. =)

By the way, is there some bibliography or something where I can ID the ammonites? Like a key or something...

Thanks again!

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Mark Kmiecik

Pyrite (iron disulfide) can be anything from bright silver to brass to bronze to metallic dark brown to metallic black, depending on the minerals it may have been exposed to, but will always have a metallic sheen. It does tend to darken and even begin to crumble with time. Google "pyrite disease" to learn more and also search it on this forum.

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Ludwigia
8 hours ago, JulianoLPD said:

By the way, is there some bibliography or something where I can ID the ammonites? Like a key or something...

This is what we have to offer here. You can use the filter on the right to narrow things down if you know the provenance. Of course you won't find everything there, so you may have to try your luck with google, where you'll discover any number of id websites.                       

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Jackson g

Another member recommended this to me; try washing your pyrite pieces with comet and a wet toothbrush. It should bring back that nice shine, and shouldn't hurt your fossils.

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caldigger
2 hours ago, Jackson g said:

Another member recommended this to me; try washing your pyrite pieces with comet and a wet toothbrush. It should bring back that nice shine, and shouldn't hurt your fossils.

Um ya, didn't do a thing when I tried it. :(

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Jackson g
18 minutes ago, caldigger said:

Um ya, didn't do a thing when I tried it. :(

Well shoot. The few I have I tried, and they all shine. No detail loss. I suppose depending on how porous the material is, and depending if it's marcasite or pyrite would also come into play. I didn't think about that at first. :unsure:

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daves64

What about trying plain old toothpaste? The paste, not the gel. Works great for removing tarnish from silver, maybe it will work on a pyrite ammonite. :shrug:

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JulianoLPD
On 09/06/2019 at 9:17 AM, Jackson g said:

Another member recommended this to me; try washing your pyrite pieces with comet and a wet toothbrush. It should bring back that nice shine, and shouldn't hurt your fossils.

Sorry for my bad english, but what's comet? :D

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caldigger
17 minutes ago, JulianoLPD said:

Sorry for my bad english, but what's comet? :D

It is a brand of powdered cleanser.

20190704_194523.png

But I am sure other brands will work just as well.  Bon Ami,  Ajax, or whatever brand is available to you.

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JulianoLPD

Ah, I see.
Don't think I'll find this here in Brazil... Is this for clothes?

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caldigger

No. It is a very fine abrasive powder for cleaning toilets, sinks, or any other hard surface that requires some heavy duty scrubbing.

I am quite sure they use something similar in Brazil, likely under a different brand name.

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Uncle Siphuncle

Microblasting with baking soda or dolomite has brightened up some of pyrite stuff.  Perhaps a protective coating immediately post blast could prevent further oxidation/tarnishing.

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JulianoLPD

Thank you, guys! I know what you're talking about.
As for the protective coating, what product would you recommend me to use?

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RJB

  I used to buy and sell all kinds of pyrite ammos from silver to gold color.  with time they will all change.   Seems like I remember someone with an idea how to keep them brand new looking but can remember who or where?  All I can do is wish you good luck.

 

RB

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Bobby Rico

A lot of time when you see very golden  pyrite ammonites the polished with wire wool . I prefer them more natural.

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