Jump to content
WI-fossil-guy

Marine Fossil ID Request

Recommended Posts

WI-fossil-guy

Fossil Forum folks have been a huge help to me so far. Here is another ID request for a fossil found recently in ORDOVICIAN limestone of SE Minnesota USA

 

fMAY-2.jpg.c8749937189b5afa7f75559f4be7a292.jpgHMAY-1.jpg.05db0678d15d9869ded882be4d2b7e2a.jpgMAY-4.jpg.b9ae504531d0b5e253f5dfc6c58c7bfb.jpg

MAY-6.jpg

MAY-5.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AJ58

Maybe some kind of Tabulate coral

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

Looks more like some sort of bryozoan, to me.  :unsure: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AJ58

I think bryozoan is a more likely ID.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WI-fossil-guy
Quote

 

If this is a bryozoan, what type might it be  and what identifying parts are visible in the fossil?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CSimpson176

Biggest kicker is seeing the photos without the ruler, showing the internal structure, the line or tube like structures being indicative of bryozoan. The hard parts of a bryozoan make up what is called the zoarium. Unfortunately, many species and even genus' of bryozoans closely resemble one another. The only ways to properly identify most colonies is by either cutting a very thin section off in order to let light pass through and be able to identify the individual tubes which could house different type of zooecium (remains of the tiny animals that made up the colonies). Another method is by using acetate peels, essentially cutting the specimen and using acid to isolate more of the internal structure and using acetate and acetone in order to be able to accurately identify all of the structure (just a very quick summary without specifics in the procedure). Either method requires the proper equipment and safety precautions. A lot of work just to identify a specimen.

 

The easiest genus to identify in my mind would be Constellaria, easily identified by the star shaped monticules on the zoarium.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WI-fossil-guy

CSimpson176, thanks for the great and detailed ID info. Knowing the species would be great but I am not equipped to attempt the ID technique you detailed. However, can I be sure it is a bryozoan? If so, is what can be seen a lateral cross-section of the colony? THANKS.

Edited by WI-fossil-guy
Clarification

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CSimpson176

I would definitely say this is a bryozoan. Yes, that would be a lateral cross section. This photo is an example of Parvohallopora, showing it's internal structure similar to your specimen (Credit to the Cincinnati Dry Dredgers).

bryozoan.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WI-fossil-guy

CSimpson176 - Thank you much for your great ID help. Your attached pic was very enlightening. Fossil hunting becomes much more enjoyable with the expert help of knowledgeable people like you and others on the Fossil Forum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CSimpson176

I'm still learning a whole lot myself as I'm by no means an expert (maybe I'll get there someday aha). Glad to have helped you on this, hoping for you to find many more things out in the field! :dinothumb:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WI-fossil-guy

CSimpson: You were a big help on my last ID Request (Bryozoan), have any ideas on my latest ID request (submitted today) - WI-fossil-guy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×