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sharkdoctor

Late spring hunt in the Yorktown Formation

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FossilsAnonymous

@sharkdoctor awesome! Always wanted to find fish material. Nice Hemi! I like the whites too

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Tidgy's Dad

Nice variety and some super finds.:)

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Gizmo

Great finds, it was cold! :thumbsu:

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sharkdoctor
21 hours ago, FossilsAnonymous said:

@sharkdoctor awesome! Always wanted to find fish material. Nice Hemi! I like the whites too

 

Thanks! I'll post some of the cleaned teeth once I get around to processing this batch. 

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sharkdoctor
20 hours ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Nice variety and some super finds.:)

 

Thanks! Tidgy might like the turtle bits that I found. I think one is from a tortoise. Pretty uncommon for a marine deposit.

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scubapro67

Do you dive or surface collect/ sift? What is the soot like material and how do you clean it off?

Thanks.

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Gizmo
On 6/11/2019 at 7:20 PM, scubapro67 said:

Do you dive or surface collect/ sift? What is the soot like material and how do you clean it off?

Thanks.

All found using scuba gear, the biofilm comes off with a dremel wire wheel or soda blaster.

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FossilNerd

Great finds! Now I’m thinking I need to take up scuba diving! 

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sharkdoctor
19 hours ago, scubapro67 said:

Do you dive or surface collect/ sift? What is the soot like material and how do you clean it off?

Thanks.

 

All 3 depending on the conditions :) In water, that film builds up over time. If it is very light, it seems to be mostly just a film of dirt, like the dirt ring on a boat hull. If the fossil is exposed for years, without any abrasion from sand, it develops into a heavy crust that seems to be bonded with the fossil. We've taken to calling this a biofilm, as the bonding is more like some biologic action rather that the accumulation of dirt. In the presence of tannins and brine, the crust then evolves into a heavy tannic crust that is no longer bonded as tightly, as though the depth of crust has killed whatever living component was driving the bond. 

 

From your profile photo, it looks like you've likely had some experience with this crust. Thoughts on removal?

For years, I used a soft wire dremel wheel at an oblique angle for mechanical removal. @Gizmo has been having spectacular results with a blaster. I've known others to use a bead blaster set at super low, as well.

In some cases, I've used an acid bath or hydrogen peroxide, but those run the risk of damaging the fossil. Definitely don't want to use on teeth except under very specific and controlled circumstances. However, they can be great when processing large batches of stable coprolite, etc.

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Rowboater

Nice!  Spectacular finds and with people getting more possessive about beach fronts maybe we'll all have to take up diving.

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ynot

Good haul.

Thanks for sharing.

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scubapro67
On ‎6‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 3:08 PM, sharkdoctor said:

 

All 3 depending on the conditions :) In water, that film builds up over time. If it is very light, it seems to be mostly just a film of dirt, like the dirt ring on a boat hull. If the fossil is exposed for years, without any abrasion from sand, it develops into a heavy crust that seems to be bonded with the fossil. We've taken to calling this a biofilm, as the bonding is more like some biologic action rather that the accumulation of dirt. In the presence of tannins and brine, the crust then evolves into a heavy tannic crust that is no longer bonded as tightly, as though the depth of crust has killed whatever living component was driving the bond. 

 

From your profile photo, it looks like you've likely had some experience with this crust. Thoughts on removal?

For years, I used a soft wire dremel wheel at an oblique angle for mechanical removal. @Gizmo has been having spectacular results with a blaster. I've known others to use a bead blaster set at super low, as well.

In some cases, I've used an acid bath or hydrogen peroxide, but those run the risk of damaging the fossil. Definitely don't want to use on teeth except under very specific and controlled circumstances. However, they can be great when processing large batches of stable coprolite, etc.

Indeed, I do a bit of river diving - picture is off Morehead City in very different water! :) My finds weren't as covered as yours, but I'd get the odd one that needed extra work. My first go over teeth is with a mix of baking soda, a little dish soap and water, mixed into a paste and scrub with a hard bristle toothbrush or similar. I'd considered using baking soda in an air brush, but haven't tried that yet.

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