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Manticocerasman

Epibionts on ammonites

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Uncle Siphuncle

Cool.  Guessing this was a post mortem attachment.

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Ludwigia
18 hours ago, Manticocerasman said:

This weekend Natalie found an intriguing fossil:

a Hypoturrillites whit an epibiont on the shell.

I've rarely seen this kind of association and it makes me wonder if the epibiont was already on the shell when the ammonite was alive or dit it grow on it after it fell on the sea floor.

If anyone has papers on the subject it would be greatly apriciated :) ( @doushantuo  maybe? )

 

In my experience you can have both situations, but it’s not always easy to determine which is the case. If the shell is covered with them mostly on just one side, then they most certainly took up residence after the animal had died and its corpse had sunk to the sea floor. If they have disturbed the growth of the shell in any obvious way, then they settled down before the creature had died. It’s hard to tell in the case of your Hypoturrilites though, although I would hazard the guess that it happened after death, since the tube worm is quite large.

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herve

Hello Thanks you

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Manticocerasman
4 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

In my experience you can have both situations, but it’s not always easy to determine which is the case. If the shell is covered with them mostly on just one side, then they most certainly took up residence after the animal had died and its corpse had sunk to the sea floor. If they have disturbed the growth of the shell in any obvious way, then they settled down before the creature had died. It’s hard to tell in the case of your Hypoturrilites though, although I would hazard the guess that it happened after death, since the tube worm is quite large.

Thx for your insight Roger.

 

the worm tube was at the underside of the ammonite ( I found it in situ ) I would expect that epibionts would have rather grown on top of it. But I don’t now if that is the case for tube worms. So this might be an indication that it was on the animal before its death, but then again the shell might have rolled over before being burrowed in the sediments. I’ll probably never know.

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Ludwigia
7 hours ago, Manticocerasman said:

Thx for your insight Roger.

 

the worm tube was at the underside of the ammonite ( I found it in situ ) I would expect that epibionts would have rather grown on top of it. But I don’t now if that is the case for tube worms. So this might be an indication that it was on the animal before its death, but then again the shell might have rolled over before being burrowed in the sediments. I’ll probably never know.

I have many ammonites where the epibionts are on both sides, indicating a turbulent environment at the very beginning of the fossilization process, but I think you’re right in saying we’ll never really know. 

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doushantuo

some of you may like:

 

misakuheteromammolepi0.pd

 

COMMENSAL ANOMIID BIVALVES ON LATE CRETACEOUS HETEROMORPH AMMONITES FROM SOUTH-WEST JAPAN
by AKIHIRO MISAKI*,HARUYOSHI MAEDA, TARO KUMAGAE and MASAHIRO ICHIDA
Palaeontology, Vol. 57, Part 1, 2014, pp. 77–95]

 

 

@Heteromorph

@Manticocerasman

 

 

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Manticocerasman
22 minutes ago, doushantuo said:

some of you may like:

 

misakuheteromammolepi0.pd

 

COMMENSAL ANOMIID BIVALVES ON LATE CRETACEOUS HETEROMORPH AMMONITES FROM SOUTH-WEST JAPAN
by AKIHIRO MISAKI*,HARUYOSHI MAEDA, TARO KUMAGAE and MASAHIRO ICHIDA
Palaeontology, Vol. 57, Part 1, 2014, pp. 77–95]

 

@Heteromorph

@Manticocerasman

 

 

Thx Ben :)

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doushantuo

if heteromorphs were actively moving animals,during its lifetime this encrustation would/might have disrupted water flow around the shell of the animal.

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