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Matthew_Dino_Searcher

Theropod data for a computer science study.

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Matthew_Dino_Searcher

Hello I am working on my PhD in computer science and am working on collecting data for my thesis.

I have been looking for a lot of data on theropod measurements like; teeth size, body mass, femur and tibia, length width, and other measurements (the more the better). 

I would like to collect samples from a few theropods like the T-Rex, Raptors, ect... and to have multiple skeleton for each. I need to have their measurement for my data points.

I know that there are some journals that give detailed measurement for each fossil they find but I do  not know how to search for them as each search yields vary results. Is there a certain key word that I should use to get the measurements for each fossil?   

I have been here https://paleobiodb.org/#/ but it does not look like the information that I need. 

Any help on this will be appreciated.    

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Coco
I think you can get in touch with the collections manager of a museum in your area that would house theropods, to explain your project. He could give you an RV to give you access to the fossils to measure them in his presence.
 
Coco

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Matthew_Dino_Searcher

I live in Japan and they only have sharks and fish on display sadly.  There is one place that has dinosaur fossils, but its hard to talk with the curator there as they only speak Japanese. I will try emailing some other museum and hopefully they have that information on hand. 

Thank you for your suggestions.   

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Kane

Interesting project. I assume you are plotting size ranges, and to do that for all theropods will be a considerable undertaking. Will you also be factoring in size variation on the basis of developmental age (for example, juveniles as opposed to mature specimens)? 

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Matthew_Dino_Searcher

No I am throwing out Ontology as it will force the Deep learning model that I am building to learn odd relationships between measurements and activity.  So I will only be looking at adults. If I stay in one species than I would look at age groups as this would allow me to model a particular species. But for my PhD it will focus on multiple species for trends. But age may be my next project.    

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Kane

It sounds like you're building an algorithm once you have some of those data inputs, and that would serve as a kind of "enclosure" that can be updated with more data. I'm curious what the output would be (search entry recall? Graphical representation?). 

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Matthew_Dino_Searcher

Ok, I will go into a little more detail. 

Based on the work from Kane, etal 2016 (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27172591) I found that he built a very simple model to tell if a theropod is a scavenger or not.

I did a lot of digging in biology and zoology and found other factors like tooth size, tooth function, prey size, ect... that contribute to a animal tending to be a scavenger or not.

So I figured I could build a deep learning model similar to their simulation but would give a nice degree of how much the theropod would rely on scavenging for a main source of energy.

So it will be a range from 0 to 100. I am betting that there should be no 0 or 100 but fall between 10-90 as no animal is fully a scavenger.       

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Kane

Thanks for the details -- it's even more interesting now, and it does seem very reminiscent of setting up a more granular probability matrix (where p0 and p1 are just ideal limit cases, and the actual data would sit within those parameters). As you proceed, I hope you'll update us!

 

As for the data points, I wish I could assist but theropods are out of my wheelhouse. Although not ideal, I would brace for having to acquire that data the slow, organic way of sifting through the journals unless someone else on here has some handy compilation of size ranges (which might be possible!). 

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Matthew_Dino_Searcher

I hear you. I have been looking for terms to search for to find what I need. 

I am looking into methods for biological data augmentation so I can built a reliable model but with fewer real data points and many simulated ones. 

But I need a good range a ratio to build out what I need.    

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doushantuo

Both Carpenter and David Smith(JVP/1998) published some biometrics on Allosaurus  ,e.g.

allo

Paleontological Research, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 250–259, December 31, 2010
doi:10.2517/1342-8144-14.4.250
Variation in a population of Theropoda (Dinosauria):Allosaurus from the Cleveland-Lloyd Quarry (Upper
Jurassic), Utah, USA
KENNETH CARPENTER

or:

 

VariationinapopulationofAllosaurus.pdf

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Matthew_Dino_Searcher

Those are a lot different than the articles I normally read. But that is a good article thank you. It gives me a way to find out more.

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doushantuo

Dunno if this would come in handy?

 

Two_applications_of_3D_semi-landmark_morphometrics.pdf

C. R. Palevol 9 (2010)

Two applications of 3D semi-landmark morphometrics implying different template designs: the theropod pelvis and the shrew skull
Deux applications de morphométrie par semi-landmarks 3D impliquant une conception différente du template : le pelvis des théropodes et le crâne des
musaraignes
Thibaud Souter, Raphael Cornette, Julio Pedraza

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