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ScienceGuy

Shark teeth identification help please

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ScienceGuy

Please help identify these teeth from Conecuh River, Andalusia. I pulled about 500 teeth out of the deposits and these tiny teeth are the only ones of its kind in the bunch. They are about 5mm X 7mm. Thanks.

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Randyw

Top one I think is 7 gill shark

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Randyw

5F6CB339-5282-4521-92B7-21C1202AC50A.jpeg

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Searcher78

Second pic reminds me of angel shark teeth.

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caldigger

I was going with Nurse Shark on #1

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And I would agree on Angel for #2

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Al Dente

Top left is Physogaleus secundus or possibly a juvenile Galeocerdo latidens. The other is Abdounia recticona. The second photo are both Orectolobus ziegenhinei.

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sixgill pete

I agree with Al Dente on this. The first two are effeminately not 7 gill shark. 

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Randyw

I will admit I’m not definite on the 7 gill shark but I came across 3 out of 3 hits on it listing it as such..and who am I to argue with the Aroura fossil museum LOL!

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sixgill pete

Randy, the geologic age of the sediments between Aurora and Andalusia Alabama are different. With a very different fauna. Also look at the root. It is completely wrong for a Hexanchid shark. It has a nutrient groove, Hexanchids do not.  The tags he provided state, Point A Dam, Eocene. That in itself makes an ID sheet provided by the Aurora Museum which includes Miocene / Pliocene species inaccurate for use.

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ScienceGuy

Thanks everyone! I’m learning more and more! I’m a Science teacher of 26 years and am gaining field experiences that will make me a more effective teacher to my students. Hopefully going to turn them on to this field of Science!

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Randyw

After Checking out the abdounia teeth I can go along with that classification.

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ScienceGuy

Can I get y’all to weigh in on these 4mm wide by 9mm long. Taken from same Eocene layer from Point A dam. The root sticks out farther than normal on the anterior side and has a nutrient groove. Roots form  an acute angle.

849AFECE-980B-4852-8A3A-45FA4D2A8BF9.jpeg

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Morfossils

Was wanting information on a good place to go digging have 12 that would live to dig and don’t know where on Conechu river don’t know if it wrong time of year never have gotten to go before thanks for the help

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sixgill pete
18 hours ago, ScienceGuy said:

Can I get y’all to weigh in on these 4mm wide by 9mm long. Taken from same Eocene layer from Point A dam. The root sticks out farther than normal on the anterior side and has a nutrient groove. Roots form  an acute angle.

849AFECE-980B-4852-8A3A-45FA4D2A8BF9.jpeg

I think you have 2 different species here. There are several species these could be. Can you post pics of front, back and left / right sides please. Preferably of each tooth individually. Then crop the pics so we get pics of only the tooth.

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ScienceGuy
17 hours ago, sixgill pete said:

I think you have 2 different species here. There are several species these could be. Can you post pics of front, back and left / right sides please. Preferably of each tooth individually. Then crop the pics so we get pics of only the tooth.

Will these pics work?  PDF file has a clearer image.thanks!

tooth compilation.pdf

 

AF2C7355-7AE2-485F-944D-F35815D194A7.png

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siteseer
On 7/16/2019 at 4:08 PM, Al Dente said:

Top left is Physogaleus secundus or possibly a juvenile Galeocerdo latidens. The other is Abdounia recticona. The second photo are both Orectolobus ziegenhinei.

 

Hi Al Dente,

 

I agree.  Yeah, that's actually a tough choice between Physogaleus and Galeocerdo.  I might lean toward the latter if only because the serrations might be stronger on both cutting edges like that tooth in Galeocerdo.  Physogaleus is so variable, though, especially in that Early-Middle Eocene time frame.

 

I was only sure the first tooth in the second photo was Orectolobus.  I forgot that someone had named the Andalusia nurse shark to species.  That's an uncommon tooth there.

 

Jess

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siteseer
On 7/18/2019 at 7:05 AM, ScienceGuy said:

Will these pics work?  PDF file has a clearer image.thanks!

tooth compilation.pdf

 

AF2C7355-7AE2-485F-944D-F35815D194A7.png

 

I don't think I've seen a sand tiger species other than Striatolamia macrota from there.  Your tooth is something else.  I think it's Odontaspis.

 

The second tooth is from a sand tiger.  I'm wondering if that could be a Striatolamia intermediate tooth.

 

 

 

 

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