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Searcher78

Small tooth

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Searcher78

What would you classify this tooth as? I have a bunch of these curved teeth?

Flag Pond, Maryland.

 

E3F8CCB7-CF9C-4F34-8772-3FBBFE29C500.jpeg

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Searcher78

7C30AB5E-3F9B-4DB4-BF6F-62DF39AC18B0.jpeg

25983A0E-01CE-4917-A140-3BF54B052E73.jpeg

8D9CD412-F24C-40CC-811A-DDC7713CFE85.jpeg

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Yasei

Maybe a Mako Shark?

It has that look to it.

 

Image result for mako shark teeth

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Fossildude19

It is always best to include location information in the body of the post, as the tags are easily overlooked, and are more for Forum Searches. ;) 

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
1 hour ago, Searcher78 said:

What would you classify this tooth as? I have a bunch of these curved teeth?

Flag Pond, Maryland.

Hi there,

 

With that deep nutrient groove you will be more likely looking at a Negaprion sp. a lemon shark or a lower Carcharhinid.  The lemon sharks are a common find alongside the Carcharhinus sp. requiem sharks that are also abundant. Hard to tell sometimes with worn teeth. Maybe @MarcoSr or @Al Dente can nail it down further.

 

Cheers,

Brett

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caldigger

It would be good to include some size reference. ie: having a scaled ruler next to the item.

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hemipristis

Lower Carcharinus teeth.  Could be dusky, Caribbean reef, or sicklefin (silky). As Caldigger noted, a scale would be helpful.  I've included some pics of lower Carcharinus teeth below, courtesy of elasmo.com.  The top is a sicklefin/silky (C. falciformis). The two in the middle are dusky (M/F), C. obscurus.  The last is Caribbean reef shark, C. perezii.  Note the scale bars.  Also note whether there are serrations on your tooth (I cannot tell from the photos).  If there are no serrations, then it's a lemon, Negaprion sp.

ds1295w-web[1].jpg

ds1299w02-web[1].jpg

ds1301g05-web[1].jpg

ds1295y-web[1].jpg

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Peace river rat
10 hours ago, hemipristis said:

Lower Carcharinus teeth.  Could be dusky, Caribbean reef, or sicklefin (silky). As Caldigger noted, a scale would be helpful.  I've included some pics of lower Carcharinus teeth below, courtesy of elasmo.com.  The top is a sicklefin/silky (C. falciformis). The two in the middle are dusky (M/F), C. obscurus.  The last is Caribbean reef shark, C. perezii.  Note the scale bars.  Also note whether there are serrations on your tooth (I cannot tell from the photos).  If there are no serrations, then it's a lemon, Negaprion sp.

ds1295w-web[1].jpg ds1299w02-web[1].jpg ds1301g05-web[1].jpg ds1295y-web[1].jpg

Informative, i would of tossed on the same shelf / jar as identical.

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Searcher78

Sorry for not posting the scaling. It was a long day yesterday. Thanks Hemipristis for the info. I do have all my similar small teeth grouped together. The tooth is about 13 mm and doesn’t really have serrations.

DB161091-2D87-4474-9C06-F2DD27D692C1.jpeg

27CEFE50-374E-468C-9046-56505BEFEED6.jpeg

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hemipristis
2 hours ago, Peace river rat said:

Informative, i would of tossed on the same shelf / jar as identical.

In large part, I still do that :D.  I can distinguish the larger female dusky lower teeth (2nd photo) due to size and bulk of the root and the stouter blade, but speciatating the rest makes my head hurt.  The uppers are difficult enough.

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hemipristis
6 hours ago, Searcher78 said:

Sorry for not posting the scaling. It was a long day yesterday. Thanks Hemipristis for the info. I do have all my similar small teeth grouped together. The tooth is about 1.3 mm and doesn’t really have serrations.

DB161091-2D87-4474-9C06-F2DD27D692C1.jpeg  27CEFE50-374E-468C-9046-56505BEFEED6.jpeg

 

 

I believe I see worn serrations near the tip (see marked up photo below). They also appear, but are very faint, on the other side as well.  This, combined with the size, leads me to believe either C. falciformis (silky) or C. perezii (Caribbean reef). 

27CEFE50-374E-468C-9046-56505BEFEED6.jpeg.20f736d2ec16e494b1d04b7d9665a4b1 (1).jpg

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Searcher78

Yes, using my microscope that I use for coins, it did look like faint or worn serrations, but I wasn't for sure.  Didn't know if I was making a stretch for it. On another note, the serrations of my Hemi's look outstanding under this electronic microscope..

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sixgill pete

I agree with @MarcoSr that the tooth is most likely a worn lower Carcharhinus sp. From the last photo, there is evidence of worn serrations near the tip. 

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