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Yoda

Hope someone can help with an ID

 

British Coal Measures - Upper Carboniferous, Silesian

 

Length approx 5cm

 

 

IMG_6533.jpg

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Mark Kmiecik

There's two or three possibilities, but without a better-focused photo the best guess is Sphenopteris, Alethopteris, or Mariopteris. Emphesis on the word 'guess'.

Edited by Mark Kmiecik
fixed sphehopteris typo

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Plantguy
4 hours ago, Mark Kmiecik said:

There's two or three possibilities, but without a better-focused photo the best guess is Sphehopteris, Alethopteris, or Mariopteris. Emphesis on the word 'guess'.

Yep as Mark said a clearer photo would narrow it down but I'm gonna take a swag and say I'm leaning more towards Mariopteris....

 

Nice find! 

Regards, Chris 

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Mark Kmiecik
8 minutes ago, Plantguy said:

Yep as Mark said a clearer photo would narrow it down but I'm gonna take a swag and say I'm leaning more towards Mariopteris....

 

Nice find! 

Regards, Chris 

I'm leaning towards Sphenopteris.

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Plantguy
14 minutes ago, Mark Kmiecik said:

I'm leaning towards Sphenopteris.

I'm ok with that....we need a good photo...

 

Regards, Chris 

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Mark Kmiecik
2 minutes ago, Plantguy said:

I'm ok with that....we need a good photo...

 

Regards, Chris 

I figured I'd lean in the other direction because if we both leaned the same way there would have been the possibility we'd both fall over. :default_rofl:

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Yoda

I will try take a better photo this evening. 

 

Thanks for the suggestions in the mean time. 

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Yoda

Another photo taken with my phone. 

Hope it's a bit clearer.

 

I have since treated with a layer of paraloid as the rock was very crumbly. 

 

 

IMG_6547.jpg

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paleoflor

Sorry, this second photograph is of little help. You will need to capture details that are essential for identification, such as the venation (density and morphology) and the pinnule margins.

 

While ago I posted this example to argue the case for sharp photographs:

 

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Fossildude19

There are some decent photo magnifying apps on the market for free. 

There are also some cheap add on lenses that may be worth looking into, if a phone is all you have to take pictures. :) 

 

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Yoda
1 hour ago, Fossildude19 said:

There are some decent photo magnifying apps on the market for free. 

There are also some cheap add on lenses that may be worth looking into, if a phone is all you have to take pictures. :) 

 

I have been taking the photos with my phone. I do have a "proper camera", but it is no good for close ups. 

 

Thanks, will look into the software and lenses. 

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Mark Kmiecik

You're trying to get too close with the phone. Back off until focused. Support the phone so it can't move as you touch the shutter release. Crop the excess 'dead space' from around the specimen. If you phone is a major brand like Apple, Samsung, LG, Nokia, etc., and manufactured in the last five years the camera is good enough to take the necessary photos. Make sure to wipe all the crud and fingerprint smudges off the lens before you shoot. Shoot outside, in diffused light but not in shadow. 

 

What is the make and model of camera that you have. It may have the ability to shoot 'close-ups' with proper lighting, etc.

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dalmayshun

An easy fix for phones, is to rubber band a jeweler's loop over the lens...the phone camera will still focus and you'll get an enlarged image. My jewelers loop has a 10x on one side and a 20x on the opposite. I use both. Only drawback I suppose is the same caution when using a  telephoto lens with a camera...use a tripod. I bought a small bendable leg tripod for my phone, and the combination enables me to take pretty good photos....in fact excellent if I really work at the lighting, angle etc. 

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Yoda
On 24/07/2019 at 9:11 PM, Mark Kmiecik said:

You're trying to get too close with the phone. Back off until focused. Support the phone so it can't move as you touch the shutter release. Crop the excess 'dead space' from around the specimen. If you phone is a major brand like Apple, Samsung, LG, Nokia, etc., and manufactured in the last five years the camera is good enough to take the necessary photos. Make sure to wipe all the crud and fingerprint smudges off the lens before you shoot. Shoot outside, in diffused light but not in shadow. 

 

What is the make and model of camera that you have. It may have the ability to shoot 'close-ups' with proper lighting, etc.

I tried again using the software that fossilsdude19 suggested, but there wasn't more detail. 

 

The camera is a bridge Panasonic. Can't think of the exact model off hand. 

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