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Howdy. Found this in a creekbed in South Texas. Curious as to what exactly it is as well as approximate age and what else can be found in the same area as these. I find quite a few of these so they seem extremely common. Typically in various sizes this being around the average

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Welcome to the Fossil Forum!  I'll give +1 for   Exogyra costata,  The age is Late Cretaceous.  As to what else can be found, that depends on the exposure.  Typical associated fossils include ammonites, echinoids, bivalves, gastropods, sometimes shark teeth, etc. - again, depending on the exposure.

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Thanks a lot guys! I'd like to get into fossil hunting and all but it's just hard to find the time. Like I said I find these guys pretty often. Usually specimens are in much worse quality however I've stumbled upon very nice ones as well. I appreciate the info!

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I’m not entirely familiar with the species, but it does look a lot like Exogyra Costata that the others suggested.

 

To determine the age of the fossil you need to look at a geological map of the area you found it in. The map will tell you what general age the rock is and many other things. Such as the name of the formation exposed in the area and possibly what other fossils you may find in the formation. 

 

Here is is a link to the US Geological Society interactive map of Texas. Hope it helps!  Texas Map

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Give the hobby whatever amount of time you have or care to and enjoy it when you do.  There's no rules about how much time you should spend.  Follow this forum as interest dictates for good info and for staying in touch.  If, at some point later in life you find you have more time, you'll be able to expand as your interests motivate you.

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I might also mention that Texas has at least 3 premier fossil clubs that, should time permit at some point, you might want to consider.  They are the Paleo Society of Austin, the Dallas Paleo Society, and the Houston Gem and Mineral Society - Paleo Section.  All can be found easily by doing an internet search.  All also have monthly meetings and field trips to multiple sites across the state and outside the state.  This is a great way to spend some time and get a lot of "bang for the buck" in terms of time spent vs. insight gained.  But, be warned: 

 

Fossil Collecting Can Be Addictive. 

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That’s a very nice specimen! Welcome and it’s good to see another Texas fossil hunter. We have some mighty fine shell fossils and invertebrates. 

 

Check out this link that JohnJ gave me in one of my topics. It’s very helpful for seeing what geological regions are in the area that your hunting and what fossils are most likely to be found.

https://txpub.usgs.gov/txgeology/

 

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Mark Kmiecik
18 hours ago, EJerry said:

Thanks a lot guys! I'd like to get into fossil hunting and all but it's just hard to find the time. Like I said I find these guys pretty often. Usually specimens are in much worse quality however I've stumbled upon very nice ones as well. I appreciate the info!

I was just about to say that's a very nice specimen. It is an oyster. Some species are called "devil's toenails".

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