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Renee351

Fossil

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Renee351

Anyone know what this might be? I found it in a creek known for aquatic fossils in northern Texas/ Texoma area but I can’t identify at all. Claw, tooth, tusk,...? The black part is hollow 

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FossilizedJello

I believe it can be a worn horse tooth. Can I see a cross section of the thicker bit ( the top in the 3rd pic ). Try searching equus sp tooths.

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Harry Pristis

 

I cannot see a horse tooth there.  It appears to be an incisor of some sort, but I don't recognize the source.

 

 

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Renee351
1 hour ago, FossilizedJello said:

I believe it can be a worn horse tooth. Can I see a cross section of the thicker bit ( the top in the 3rd pic ). Try searching equus sp tooths.

The black portion of it is hollow.its actually quite difficult to get a decent picture of.

AD7674E3-CA22-47F2-B635-24477001E79D.jpeg

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Renee351
35 minutes ago, Harry Pristis said:

 

I cannot see a horse tooth there.  It appears to be an incisor of some sort, but I don't recognize the source.

 

 

I agree that it could be an incisor as well. I’ve been searching for 2 days trying to find something similar. 

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Harry Pristis

 

The enamel seems to extend much higher on the outside of the curve than on the inside.  That is a characteristic of domestic pig incisors.  But this doesn't resemble very closely the incisors I've seen.  I wonder if this isn't a deciduous pig tooth, perhaps a canine (I think there are no deciduous incisors).

 

 

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Renee351
On 8/10/2019 at 4:26 PM, Harry Pristis said:

 

The enamel seems to extend much higher on the outside of the curve than on the inside.  That is a characteristic of domestic pig incisors.  But this doesn't resemble very closely the incisors I've seen.  I wonder if this isn't a deciduous pig tooth, perhaps a canine (I think there are no deciduous incisors).

 

 

Definitely gives me a different angle to search. I was unaware that pig teeth did that tho.

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Renee351

So I sent some pictures to a museum to help me identify what this might be.

They suggested a Platygonus. Pretty much a prehistoric pig from the ice age. 

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