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sharkdoctor

Finally got back in the field again this year

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sharkdoctor

A few random bits including a good sized coprolite:

5d52f34897248_Random_resize.thumb.jpg.55eeb0e6cb360c68b12bc68228504ffe.jpg

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caldigger

20190813_110819.png

 

I think I'm in love! :wub:   Just look at that color.

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Darktooth
20 hours ago, caldigger said:

20190813_110819.png

 

I think I'm in love! :wub:   Just look at that color.

You better put a ring on it!

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sharkdoctor

No nuptials until we discuss a dowry!

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Plax

Old Church Fm?

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sharkdoctor

The cuspiest tooth was likely reworked into the Calvert Formation from the Piney Point or the Old Church. I'm not sure if it is an auriculatus or an angustidens. You probably get the same sort of mixing in NC.?. 

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Plax

Auriculatis grade into angustidens so it's difficult to tell them apart for me unless I see a profile. Am not much of a shark tooth person though. We probably get more mixing here in NC than most anyplace else on the east coast. Wide coastal plain with numerous scour fills and the Cape Fear Arch are no doubt responsible. 

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sharkdoctor

Yeah, the problem is that so many of the possible "grades" are available in this region, so it makes it hard to tease out what is what when working with reworked material.

 

BTW, I was intrigued when you said you aren't interested in sharks, but your profile mentions vertebrates as an interest. What fossil vertebrates pique your interest along the Atlantic Coastal Plain?

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sharkdoctor

Update on IDs, thanks to Dr Robert Weems:

The turtle humerus is from Trachyaspis lardyi .

The large reptile vertebra is likely from: Thecachampsa antiquus

 

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Al Tahan

Dang those teeth are gorgeous :wub:....great finds!

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caldigger
1 hour ago, Al Tahan said:

Dang those teeth are gorgeous :wub:....great finds!

I would love it if some of those items I find came in that deep sable color. It's just gorgeous!

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sharkdoctor
4 hours ago, Al Tahan said:

Dang those teeth are gorgeous :wub:....great finds!

 

Thanks! I'll post a pic once they are prepped.

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Plax
On 8/15/2019 at 11:31 AM, sharkdoctor said:

Yeah, the problem is that so many of the possible "grades" are available in this region, so it makes it hard to tease out what is what when working with reworked material.

 

BTW, I was intrigued when you said you aren't interested in sharks, but your profile mentions vertebrates as an interest. What fossil vertebrates pique your interest along the Atlantic Coastal Plain?

Am actually most interested in geology and stratigraphy in particular. I'm not disinterested in shark teeth but find other vertebrate fossils such as marine reptiles more interesting.

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