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-Andy-

Unidentified Singapore fossils, bivalve expert needed

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-Andy-

Hi all, I have fossils from Singapore's Jurong Formation, aged from late Triassic to early Jurassic (235 - 175 mya). Some were found over 10 years ago by a fossil-digger while others were dug up recently by the two of us. Several specimens have been handed over to our local museum. However, no one really knows what family or genus these bivalves belong to. I was hoping you guys could help.

 

Specimen 0A

0A_1.thumb.jpg.8da603c27ce2a30af45707162dfba11f.jpg

 

Specimen 0B

0B_1.thumb.jpg.4f216d9b194a8f11f23de4a747b3f74f.jpg

 

Specimen 0B alt view

0B_2.thumb.jpg.aa9bb076abb30d5e91ec11a47e8b1c8d.jpg

 

Specimen 0B alt view

0B_3.thumb.jpg.9a8c4e1aa26f088c9e479484de79cb66.jpg

 

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-Andy-

Specimen 0C

0C_1.thumb.jpg.110e71de7361079c336b160375e20b2c.jpg

 

Specimen 0C alt view

0C_2.thumb.jpg.80721588b7b45e4027fbe60ae478fc43.jpg

 

Specimen 0C alt view

0C_3.thumb.jpg.a2625e98e56af61e6e40715819ecb8e8.jpg

 

Specimen 1A

1A_1.thumb.jpg.77a3d48fa4ba922434fb45a91cbb4f82.jpg

 

Specimen 1A with alt lighting

1A_2.thumb.jpg.cb6fbf9fc7fb0347fef5545fbafdf5a0.jpg

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-Andy-

Specimen 1C

1C_1.thumb.jpg.b7a10324ba9b4bcc15bac682ee466964.jpg

 

Specimen 1C alt view

1C_2.thumb.jpg.5bf44f24cab2c61ebcb79e42607d0b56.jpg

 

Specimen 1D

1D_1.thumb.jpg.14b20151a81e6bc2c720be86b06e4b09.jpg

 

Specimen 1D alt view

1D_2.thumb.jpg.6f1223ce4a16f0d0daa5be16dfe23883.jpg

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caldigger

Let's try Mr. Bivalve himself. @Max-fossils

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Max-fossils
On 8/19/2019 at 7:53 PM, caldigger said:

Let's try Mr. Bivalve himself. @Max-fossils

Thanks for the tag, but these little dudes are way too old for me! 

I'm sorry Andy, but I've got no clue for those cool bivalves, can't recognize any. :( 

However what might be helpful is to try to get a specimen (of any of the species) completely out of the matrix so that a good overall view of the shell's anatomy can be obtained (especially of the hinge!), but looking at your photos I'm afraid that this may be extremely hard to do due to the matrix's hardness. Maybe the museum you sent the specimens to has some really good prepping tools (or other types of tools) that will make us able to see what kinds of hinges we got?

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westcoast

I doubt that any of these are preserved well enough to give a confident ID

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-Andy-
On 26/08/2019 at 5:05 AM, Max-fossils said:

Thanks for the tag, but these little dudes are way too old for me! 

I'm sorry Andy, but I've got no clue for those cool bivalves, can't recognize any. :( 

However what might be helpful is to try to get a specimen (of any of the species) completely out of the matrix so that a good overall view of the shell's anatomy can be obtained (especially of the hinge!), but looking at your photos I'm afraid that this may be extremely hard to do due to the matrix's hardness. Maybe the museum you sent the specimens to has some really good prepping tools (or other types of tools) that will make us able to see what kinds of hinges we got?

 

On the contrary, the matrix is so fragile and flaky that I see pieces dropping out each time I handle them. I dare not get any specimens outta the matrix.

 

I've got only one answer so far from Facebook - Lima sp. pelecypod

The museum is at a loss too since they have never dealt with Singapore fossils before

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DPS Ammonite

I found a reference that shows a few fossils from the Jurong Fm. Look for the references mentioned about the Jurong. Also contact the Lee Kong Chian Natural Museum for help. 

 

GeologyGuideSGP.pdf

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-Andy-
On 09/09/2019 at 11:35 PM, DPS Ammonite said:

I found a reference that shows a few fossils from the Jurong Fm. Look for the references mentioned about the Jurong. Also contact the Lee Kong Chian Natural Museum for help. 

 

GeologyGuideSGP.pdf

 

Hi, I can't see any link. We are in talks with the LKC Museum.

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Max-fossils
On 9/9/2019 at 4:58 PM, -Andy- said:

Lima sp. pelecypod

Mwah, that's a pretty bad answer. Pelecypod is a really old name for bivalve and no longer used. 

Also, if you google "Lima shell", you'll see that the shell doesn't look much like the fossils you have. 

Lima is quite a famous genus, and I've often seen people classify random bivalves as "Lima" just because that's the only bivalve genus they know :( 

If I were you I would dismiss that answer, doesn't sound very researched to me. 

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DPS Ammonite
33 minutes ago, Max-fossils said:

Mwah, that's a pretty bad answer. Pelecypod is a really old name for bivalve and no longer used. 

Also, if you google "Lima shell", you'll see that the shell doesn't look much like the fossils you have. 

Limas have pronounced radial ribs; these do not. 

 

I agree that that Pelecypoda is not the preferred term, however it is still used and you should know that it is a synonym for bivalves. 

https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/pp1228B

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Max-fossils
Just now, DPS Ammonite said:

Limas have pronounced radial ribs; these do not. 

 

I agree that that Pelecypoda is not the preferred term, however it is still used and you should know that it is a synonym for bivalves. 

https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/pp1228B

I agree, the shell shown here doesn't fit with Lima, for several reasons. 

However the class' name is Bivalvia, and no longer Pelecypoda, so that term shouldn't be used anymore. It would be like referring to the meg as "Carcharocles megalodon" instead of Otodus megalodon. The link you sent is from a paper published in 1984, which does date to 35 years back, a time where Pelecypoda was used more frequently. 

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DPS Ammonite

Use the newer terms; know the older terms. 

 

Everyone should know that pelecypods are bivalves so that you can find older and sometimes newer literature. (It is sort of like knowing what an icebox is.) Same thing for Carcharocles. Google Scholar still notes usage of pelecypod in recent literature. 

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?as_ylo=2015&q=pelecypod&hl=en&as_sdt=0,5

 

It does look like usage of pelecypod decreased rapidly after the 80s: link 

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