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hokietech96

Fossil ID (Shark Tooth)

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hokietech96

I look for teeth on the beach all the time and I found this one this summer.  It the 3rd one of this type I found this summer.  Is this a Bull Shark?  Sorry for my fingers.  Couldn't get the picture to focus on paper.  Thank you in advance for any feedback.

 

Mark

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WhodamanHD

Carcharhinus (luecas?)

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hokietech96

that's what I thought; bull shark.  Never found on the beach in NJ but found 3 this year.  I have found much bigger teeth on the beach this summer than previous.

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Praefectus

I agree, Bull shark.

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hemipristis
8 hours ago, Praefectus said:

I agree, Bull shark.

+1 Carcharhinus leucas

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hokietech96

Thanks for everyone's feedback.  I know its only a bull shark, but its been my favorite tooth I found from the beach this year.

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DevilDog

Very nice tooth.

 

Today I learned that you can find fossil shark teeth in New Jersey. :)

 

Some of my  favorite teeth are "common" ones. Sometimes the location or circumstances of the find are more important than the rarity of the species...

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hokietech96

Thanks!  

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The Jersey Devil

Interesting find for a beach. Pleistocene teeth wash up on NJ beaches occasionally.

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hemipristis
15 hours ago, DevilDog said:

Very nice tooth.

 

Today I learned that you can find fossil shark teeth in New Jersey. :)

 

Some of my  favorite teeth are "common" ones. Sometimes the location or circumstances of the find are more important than the rarity of the species...

Yes!

 

I collect Carcharhinus teeth, and have thousands; the definition of 'common' when one is talking Miocene-Pliocene teeth.  When I tell people I'm trying to speciate them, I get: "Why?"   :D

 

Though I must say, it might be paying off.  After hours (and hours) of examining, comparing & contrasting, I'm starting to believe that there are several more species that need to be added to the 'known species list' from some of the East Coast localities.

 

PS Have you been to Sewell, NJ yet?  Also, one can find small (usually worn) teeth at Cape May's 'Diamond Beach'

 

 

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