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Fossildude19

Looks like you are getting good at reading the rocks there, K-man.

 

Thanks for the report and pics!

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Ludwigia
5 hours ago, Kane said:

Thanks, Roger. :) Maybe next year when you're on this side of the pond I can take you there (if not another possible spot I have my eye on that is an actual outcrop in the lower Devonian). As long as the fill continues paying out like this, I may as well keep digging at it. 

Sounds good :)

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Bobby Rico

Great thread Kane, interesting finds and some nice photos.

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Kane

Today's haul was very light indeed: a single Acanthopyge cephalon:

PA090405.JPG

PA090409.JPG

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Kane

And on the same rock and bedding plane was this oddball. It has more pygidial ribs than a Pseudodechenella methinks, and the pygidial axis has a very tight taper. I'll need to retrieve the positive. Not sure about it (any thoughts @piranha?):

PA090411.JPG

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piranha

Compare with: Trypaulites erinus

 

Lespérance, P.J. 1975

Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Synphoriidae (Lower and Middle Devonian Dalmanitacean Trilobites).

Journal of Paleontology, 49(1)91-137

 

image.png.9bcfe3a1055d069d14cdde5a5e79efc8.png

 

image.thumb.png.c571fa056ff78bd265d7aff74d8f3b52.png

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Kane

Thanks, Scott! I was just eyeing that one up in my copy of the Lesperance text. Seems the most likely match. 

But then I'm left a bit confused with this being a bedding plane neighbour to the Acanthopyge (they sit about 3 cm apart!). :wacko: I think the lichid is the one out of place! :P ... Or the more likely suggestion that Acanthopyge does appear in the Bois Blanc Fm, but has yet to be reported there (it appears in the overlying Amherstburg Fm).

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FossilNerd

I love this thread! It’s like Kane’s very own box of chocolates. You never know what you are going to get! Keep at it my friend. You have found some amazing stuff so far! 

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dinosaur man

Kane love this thread you have helped me out alot I live in the bois blanc formation and have been fossil hunting here for years very helpful Thanks!! :)

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Kane
On 2019-10-09 at 9:10 PM, FossilNerd said:

I love this thread! It’s like Kane’s very own box of chocolates. You never know what you are going to get! Keep at it my friend. You have found some amazing stuff so far! 

Thanks, Wayne. :) I know it is as niche as it gets to be making a bit of a study of a single unit in a single formation in Ontario. :P But, hey, at least now I have the picture on the puzzle box.

 

7 hours ago, dinosaur man said:

Kane love this thread you have helped me out alot I live in the bois blanc formation and have been fossil hunting here for years very helpful Thanks!! :)

Glad you are enjoying it. :) You are lucky to be where it naturally outcrops given that outcrops of this formation outside of quarries is far from common. As you likely know, the material can be uncooperative at the best of times!

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Kane

- Two Acanthopyge heads and a tail

- Two Crassiproetus tails in fair shape

- Finely detailed matrix-free rostroconch, just because.

fullsizeoutput_5a1.jpeg

PA110417.JPG

PA110419.JPG

PA110421.JPG

PA110423.JPG

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Bobby Rico

Nice addition to the thread. :dinothumb:

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Fossildude19

Wow!

The site that keeps on giving.  :)

Some sweet finds once again!

 

I know you're a bit over the rostroconchs, but I think they are pretty neat!

Glad you were out there, K-man.

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Kane

Thanks, guys. :) 

Now if only I could find a complete one... :zzzzscratchchin:

At some point, I have to take some of the big brachs and platycerids home. If only I knew a bryozoan collector as they are incredibly diverse in this material (sadly, I have to destroy many of them in search of the bugs). 

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Scylla
3 hours ago, Kane said:

Thanks, guys. :) 

Now if only I could find a complete one... :zzzzscratchchin:

At some point, I have to take some of the big brachs and platycerids home. If only I knew a bryozoan collector as they are incredibly diverse in this material (sadly, I have to destroy many of them in search of the bugs). 

Do you find any silicified fossils in your site? I know chert occurs in that formation too. Maybe you could acid prep some of the rock to get nice clean bryzoans?

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Kane

A chilly morning with tough rock. Of all the rocks, only one was paying out today.

 

First up, this strange bit with pustular surface, and a nicely articulated Pseudodechenella planimarginata pygidium:

PA120429.JPG

PA120437.JPG

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Kane

Next up, what I suspect to be another lichid spine, positive and negative, plus a closeup:

PA120433.JPG

PA120435.JPG

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Kane

Finally, what I would consider my trip-maker. Another nearly complete, cheekless Pseudodechenella planimarginata. Nearly didn't make it given the rock's density and the force needed to get them apart. It appeared just where the hammer struck, so a close call. 

 

Positive and negative: 

PA120427.JPG

PA120431.JPG

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Kane
5 hours ago, Scylla said:

Do you find any silicified fossils in your site? I know chert occurs in that formation too. Maybe you could acid prep some of the rock to get nice clean bryzoans?

I think a few, pending the type of rock. 

I couldn't see myself working with acids though, and certainly won't be putting much effort into bryozoans. :D 

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piranha

Pseudodechenella planimarginata has more pygidial ribs / rings and does not have axial nodes. 

 

Pygidium semicircular, almost twice as wide as long, with a distinct, low-convex, moderately wide brim. Axis about one fourth the width of pygidium, tapering posteriorly, terminating just anterior to brim, composed of about 12 smooth, low-convex segments. Pleurae composed of 8 to 10 smooth, flat-topped segments. Medial furrows present on pleural segments of exfoliated specimens.

 

image.png.ee5e27a948d5163b8b19c21d896d0eb1.png

 

Stumm, E.C. 1953

Lower Middle Devonian Proetid Trilobites from Michigan, Southwestern Ontario, and Northern Ohio.

Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology, University of Michigan, 11(2):11-31  PDF LINK

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Fossildude19

Awesome, Kane! 

That'll be a fun prep. ;) 

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Kane

Thanks, Scott. I had went with that as what I had listed in the Bois Blanc, not seeing any others. I’ll double check Stumm... P. clara is listed, but doesn’t appear to be that one. :headscratch:

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piranha

Lieberman has a few look-alike "cf" species. mail?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmail.yimg.com%2Fok%2Fu%2Fassets%2Fimg%2Femoticons%2Femo71.gif&t=1570906382&ymreqid=23281213-8dc1-3cff-1cb7-690008011800&sig=K8DWVSrUCK98_Jr54MdZ7A--~C

 

Lieberman, B.S. 1994

Evolution of the trilobite subfamily Proetinae Salter, 1864, and the origin, diversification, evolutionary affinity, and extinction of the

Middle Devonian proetid fauna of eastern North America. American Museum of Natural History Bulletin, 223:1-176  PDF LINK

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Kane

Didn't do so well today (no lichids) as the good rocks are running dry. But, still possibly something new. Possibly Mystrocephala stummi judging by the sharp axial ribs and the nodules.

 

Comparison image from Ludvigsen, R. (1987) Reef trilobites from the Formosa Limestone (Lower Devonian) of southern Ontario. Can. J. Earth Sci 24

 

fullsizeoutput_5a2.jpeg

Screen Shot 2019-10-13 at 2.06.35 PM.png

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