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wkndtrvlr

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wkndtrvlr

Found the bones in northern kansas in a wash out.  They were 8 - 10’ below the surface.

image.jpg

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Fossildude19

Welcome to the Forum. :) 

 

Unfortunately, these are not bones. 

They appear to be oddly shaped pieces of limestone. 

Not seeing any bone texture or morphology here. 

Regards,

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caldigger

Mammoth/ Mastodon carpal bones?

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DPS Ammonite

I see evidence of two piece being bone. The top right piece shows interior spongy texture. The lower right piece has vertical parallel cracks and a possible foremen near the top. I suspect the others are also bones since they have the same color as the probable bones and they have some unusual concave surfaces.

 

Clearer up close photos might help us determine if they all are bones. They also might make me change my mind about the two pieces being bones.

FEC4B9B7-1DF1-4934-B2F9-51766D70C0BD.jpeg

6031FB26-224F-4760-AD25-2F58B54344B0.jpeg

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JohnJ

Welcome.  I also see bones.  Can you take photos of each bone from different views?

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Fossildude19

:duh2:     Sorry, ...  I guess I should stick to fish and invertebrates.  :blush:

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Auspex

Some resemble cuboid bones.
@Harry Pristis can probably help here.

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Carboniferouspat

Definitely bones. A large mammal. 

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Harry Pristis

Elephantoid bones -- mastodont or gomphothere, I think.  The long bones appear to be the proximal tibia and the distal humerus (the one with the binding).  The others appear to be carpals, which I find devilishly difficult to ID from images, particularly with just a single aspect of the bones.  

Edited by Harry Pristis
NOT elephantoid bones -- my error of scale.

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wkndtrvlr

Thanks for the help.  I uploaded more pictures.  In images 1237, 1239 and 1240, is there any significance to the chips at the broken end of the bone and nature of the break itself?  I was wondering if the chips could have been caused by a tool of some sort? 

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wkndtrvlr

In the 3rd, 4th and 5th picture up from the bottom, do the chips at the broken end of the bone and the nature of the break itself, indicate any type of tool use?

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Harry Pristis

I wasn't paying enough attention to the scale.  These are not elephantoid bones.  They do better resemble bison bones.  See if you recognize any of these:

 

5d79bdfd98277_bisoncarpalsmetacarpals.jpg.2c9a797c0071489414f941d63b7375f2.jpg

 

 

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hemipristis
On 9/11/2019 at 8:04 PM, wkndtrvlr said:

Thanks for the help.  I uploaded more pictures.  In images 1237, 1239 and 1240, is there any significance to the chips at the broken end of the bone and nature of the break itself?  I was wondering if the chips could have been caused by a tool of some sort? 

IMG_1211.JPG  IMG_1212 (1).JPG IMG_1212.JPG IMG_1213.JPG IMG_1214.JPG IMG_1215.JPG IMG_1216.JPG IMG_1217.JPG IMG_1218.JPG

IMG_1219.JPG IMG_1220.JPG IMG_1221.JPG IMG_1222.JPG IMG_1223.JPG IMG_1224.JPG IMG_1225.JPG  IMG_1226.JPG IMG_1227.JPG

IMG_1228.JPG IMG_1229.JPG IMG_1230.JPG IMG_1231.JPG IMG_1232.JPG IMG_1233.JPG  IMG_1239.JPG IMG_1240.JPG

 

 

Any chance you could retake these two at high-res or closeup?

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grandpa

I don't know bones.  I'm in an invert. fossil area.  But I think you and I have to both agree that the expertise in the vert. fossil department of paleo of TFF is absolutely amazing.

AND, let me add my welcome to TFF from Austin, Tx.

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Harry Pristis
On ‎9‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 8:08 PM, wkndtrvlr said:

In the 3rd, 4th and 5th picture up from the bottom, do the chips at the broken end of the bone and the nature of the break itself, indicate any type of tool use?

 

Green bone - that is, fresh bone - tends strongly to fracture closer to the long axis of the bone (a "green-stick fracture").  This bone was broken long after death.  Marrow extraction was commonly done by drilling and boiling the bone.  Tools commonly were carefully scored before being separated from the bone.  Consequently, there is no logical reason for anything (or anyone) to deliberately break the bone in this manner.

 

Bone is primarily composed of hydroxyapatite and collagen. Hydroxyapatite is an inorganic compound of calcium, phosphate, and hydroxide which is organized in a crystal latticework that gives bone (and teeth) structural rigidity. It preserves well as a fossil under some conditions.

Collagen is a fiberous protein that serves as connective tissue in bones and muscles. It does not preserve well in a fossil. As collagen decomposes, it may be replaced in the hydroxyapatite latticework by minerals from the depositional environment (e.g. silica dioxide dissolved in groundwater). If nothing replaces the collagen, as with some cave fossils, the latticework becomes quite brittle. Bone with collagen is least likely to chip.


 

 

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