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Xoomsmith

I can’t find this on google. Norway whiffle bird??

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Xoomsmith

"A petrified rectum of a norway whiffle bird."

 

It came with a card I no longer have.

The card describes it as a fossil. I do have a picture of the card and will upload it as well as a picture of the item.

The name Ruben Shafer is on the card with what I assume to be a date next to it 1962.

 

B8853709-6EE1-4EC6-A587-4F534979A175.jpeg

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grandpa

Welcome to the fossil forum from Austin.  What I believe you have there is a button coral.  Someone else may come along soon to provide genus and species.  I suspect that it is modern and not fossil, but that's just a suspicion on my part.

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Xoomsmith

Thanks for your insight. I have a picture of the card it came with here. I can only assume the item I have is what it refers to. Would a picture of the items underside help?

9426FBF7-20C2-49A5-9C09-2DB9D2C16DBA.jpeg

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grandpa
4 minutes ago, Xoomsmith said:

Would a picture of the items underside help?

 

Yes, thank you.

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Darktooth

I suspect that this was meant to be some kind of prank. A birds rectum actually fossilizing is a very slim chance.  As in slim to none. It is an interesting  piece and I am very curious  about what it actually is. This Ruben guy seems to be a prankster!

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Xoomsmith

Here it is. If it could be better let me know :)

image.jpg

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grandpa

Yep, pretty sure it is a button coral, likely modern.

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connorp

It is the skeleton of a modern Fungia coral.

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Xoomsmith

Well well.... I guess I will go cry now lol good to know that its not so rare at least. Thank you so much! I wasn’t expecting any reply so quickly 

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caldigger
13 minutes ago, connorp said:

It is the skeleton of a modern Fungia coral.

Correct.  Also commonly called a "plate coral", they are popular for use in fish aquariums.

Here are a few shots of what they look like alive.

20190911_183851.png

20190911_183912.png

20190911_183829.png

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Fossildude19

I saw a similar item on the auction site with the same card, a few years ago. 

Poor woman wanted beaucoup bucks for it. :eyeroll:

I messaged her to tell her it was a prank gift. 

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Randyw

Not to mention that there is no such thing as a wiffle bird...outside of cartoons. And fictional books. First used around 1927. Made famous in Popeyes cartoon. Although there is a bird flight movement called whiffling.

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Xoomsmith

Thats why in the TITLE I said I cant find it on google. Any way I typed it. Including whiffle bird. Thanks

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Ludwigia

I couldn't help but notice that the "ammonite" which is partly visible in your photos which you used as a pedestal to support the button coral appears to be completely carved.

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Rockwood
32 minutes ago, Ludwigia said:

I couldn't help but notice that the "ammonite" which is partly visible in your photos which you used as a pedestal to support the button coral appears to be completely carved.

I think that might be a decorative wood carving that is not intended to represent a real fossil.

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