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readinghiker

Cretolamnid?

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readinghiker

Back again for more information.  These teeth are driving me nuts.  I am working on a Coniacian deposit from north central New Mexico, and have gotten around 20,000

fossils from sifting and screen washing ant hills.  The vast majority are scapanorhynchids (over 12,000), but there are at least 25 other species represented.  These teeth come

from a possible barrier island deposit, and the wave action prior to fossilization must have been intense, since almost all the teeth are missing roots.  There are around 1500 teeth

that look like scapanorhyncus cf. raphiodon, but they have no striations.  I was informed by Shawn Hamm that these probably are scapanorhynchids that simply have the striations 

worn off, something he has seen in the Atco formation in Texas.  However, there are around 1500 other teeth that were identified as Cretolamna by Bruce Welton (who personally viewed

the collection), but this is disputed by Shawn Hamm, who thinks they are either scapanorhynchus or possibly dallasiella (although I am not aware that this genus has been recorded in New

Mexico).  Anyone out there want to venture an opinion?  I will be put two more photos on another post.

Randy

 

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readinghiker

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20190911_164346052.png

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Macrophyseter

I think there could be a possibility of being Cretodus crassidens or lesser known species such as Protolamna.

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readinghiker
6 hours ago, Macrophyseter said:

I think there could be a possibility of being Cretodus crassidens or lesser known species such as Protolamna.

 

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readinghiker

Thanks, I will be looking into both of these species.

 

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Harry Pristis

 

Cretolamna is an otodontid, not a "cretolamnid."  There is no family Cretolamnidae.

 

 

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