Jump to content
FranzBernhard

Miocene sites around St. Josef, Styria, Austria (10/01/2019)

Recommended Posts

Kasia

Very nice finds and - as usual - fantastic precision in respect of locations :dinothumb: Thanks for sharing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ludwigia

Nice finds, Franz and a very good description of the accompanying circumstances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Monica

Beautiful gastropods and bivalves, Franz!  I especially like the pieces with different species present on the same rock - very nice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Max-fossils

As usual, fantastic report Franz! I'm always so impressed by how rich those sites are. I can't wait to go look at them myself one day (hopefully!).

Thanks for sharing! 

Max

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Plantguy

Nice photos Franz! Thanks for sharing the report. 

Regards, Chris 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDAWG

:wub: :wub: :wub:

Love the fossils and the locality photos.  Almost feel as if I am there, except of course that I cannot collect anything myself.

 

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

Excellent report, pictures and finds!

Thanks for the field trip! :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ludwigia

You sure do have some lovely molluscs there you lucky guy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RuMert

Preservation is very good, some look as if alive

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pixpaleosky

Good pictures and report. Thanks to which document or source do you identify the shells ? I have fossils of a very similar fauna from french miocene and still have a few undetermined species. And how do you realize the black backgroung on the picture ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coco

Hi,

 

Pixpaleosky, where your miocene shells come from in France ? From memory it seems to me that I have some PDF publications on Miocene molluscs, and even of Redonien (Pliocene basal), but I would need time to look a little (during the Toussaint holidays) If you remember me that ;)

 

Coco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pixpaleosky

Hi @FranzBernhard, thank you for your kind reply and i will have a close look at the documents ! Maybe i will do an ID topic. Your camera setup is as cheap as mine but it works well !

 

Hi @Coco, the location is Vaucluse, and the exact age is Tortonian. The shells are in grey marl. I identified 90% of them but i am stuck on the rest.

If you have anything helpful it is welcome :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coco

Hi,

 

I am not able to attach files to public responses, but I can in MP (what I did for Pixpaleoski). I think it’s been like that for several years... Can an administrator help me ? Thanks.
 
Coco

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FranzBernhard

Starting over with:

Bramberg-1

 

I "discovered" this site nearly 4 years ago. It was obvious, that it is already known to collectors, at least the western part. You can have a look at it here:

Bramberg-1

The eastern outcrop, about 20 m away, was heavily overgrown and only somewhat later I realized, that it could be an old dig site. The whole are was heavily collected around 1900!

This was the situation at the eastern outcrop at 10/01/2019 (yes, camera is working again, and yes, the pics are sucking again...):

Bramberg_1_01102019_kompr.thumb.jpg.89362eb36ecf4b9dfcd8207c7c501a3e.jpg

The outcrop is about 4 m long and 1 m high, and located about 4 m above a very small creek.

A collector from Vienna had visited this site in September 2019 and left lots of debris behind (upper left) with plenty of fossils (lower left). This site is dominated by bivalves, the most obvious are Linga columbella, Anadara diluvii and, less common, Pecten styriacus. Shell density is very high, but this is not good, because high shell density increases permeability and dissolution of shells, resulting in very fragile fossils, except very thick-shelled or calcitic ones. And shell fragments are also very abundant!

 

Despite these problems, I was able to recover about 15 different bivalve species from the debris in a short time, but only 3 gastropod species.

Mischung_Bramberg1_01102019_mitText_kompr.thumb.jpg.1438e8f62ca4c2ed302082a0b35d1361.jpg

Already posted in "Fossil du Jour"...

 

Mischung_Bramberg1_01102019_b_Text_kompr.thumb.jpg.eab29e40177de7971327518aea016fe4.jpg

Left one is new for the site, right one the second one for the site, nice combo.

 

Mischung_Bramberg1_01102019_c_Text_kompr.thumb.jpg.55ba8316ae2de3ddaf24c623c371c9dc.jpg

Nice bivalve with cute, little new gastro for the site.

Continued...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FranzBernhard

Zusammenstellung_Bramberg1_01102019_kompr.thumb.jpg.ebb2713b859cf43830b1d27c4dfaf88d.jpg

Collage with 9 different bivalve species. @Max-fossils ;).

Circomphalus sp. and Caryocorbula carinata are new for the site.

 

Additionally observed bivalves were: Diplodonta rodundataGlycymeris sp., Ostrea digitalina.

Additional gastropod: Granulolabium plicatum.

Total count of species is now around 35.

 

Bramberg-2

I took nothing from Bramberg-2. Its a rather large outcrop (about 10 m long) near a small creek, and well known to collectors. It is dominated by the mud snail Granulolabium plicatum, followed in abundance by Granulolabium bicinctum. Other fossils are rather rare, but they do exist (some Terebralia, Vitta picta, tellinid bivalves etc.).

 

That´s all from this day. Great variety in very short time. Thanks for your interest!
Franz Bernhard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andy B

those are beautiful!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Max-fossils

More beautiful fossils! Such a cool area; I love how different the species representations are from one site to another, even though they're all relatively close to each other. Very interesting!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
niber

Hi Franzbernhard

If it can help you:

The muricid is a very nice Ocenebra boeckhi (Hoernes & Auinger, 1885)

Sometimes call Hadriania boeckhi……….

Sans titre 7.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
niber

This one is not a muricid

it's a schell belongs Ranellidae- Cymatiinae, genus Monoplex

1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DPS Ammonite
On 10/14/2019 at 2:49 AM, Coco said:

Hi,

 

I am not able to attach files to public responses, but I can in MP (what I did for Pixpaleoski). I think it’s been like that for several years... Can an administrator help me ? Thanks.
 
Coco

 

Hello Coco. Are you still having problems attaching files? If so, maybe someone more capable than I can help. @Fossildude19

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×