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Joanne0864

Mushroom

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Joanne0864

Was needing help identifying this fossil.  Looks like a Morrell mushroom?

 

1570541534672-19449444.thumb.jpg.ed78d2feb64a88ab7a11219c4b5abb80.jpg

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Fossildude19

Welcome to the Forum. :) 

 

Where was this found?

What is the size of it? 

Can we get pictures of both ends, and the other side?

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doushantuo

I can tell you right away that it isn't

I wouldn't be surprised if others here will tell you that too

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Fossildude19

Probably not a fossilized mushroom. Fossilized mushrooms are  indeed quite rare, and are usually flattened and carbonized. 

Giving us more images and information on the find would help narrow down the possibilities of what it could be. 

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Joanne0864

Found along the Ohio River in Southern Indiana. Lots of Indian artifacts also found in the area. 1570542998416693226280.thumb.jpg.e252e8d01a8ece14e461d00a616830d9.jpg

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Fossildude19

Cropped and brightened:

 

1570543668357-2104218801.thumb.jpg.d8185fa3d1f382ec3beefc656376d478.jpg  1570542998416693226280.thumb.jpg.e252e8d01a8ece14e461d00a616830d9.jpg  1570541534672-19449444.thumb.jpg.ed78d2feb64a88ab7a11219c4b5abb80.jpg

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Fossildude19

Southern Indiana is a big area.  :unsure: 
Can you mention the county or closest city/town? 

The Ohio river is basically the southern border of Indiana. 

According to this bedrock geological map of Indiana, it could be from any of the 5 time periods that are exposed in the state. 

Perhaps you could narrow it down to one of the colors on the map?

If we can figure out the age of the area, we have a better chance of ID. 

Also, another picture of the flat end, in daylight might help. 

That area is a bit blurry in the photo you posted. 

 

The material looks like chert, or some other type of cryptocrystaline rock. 

 

about1.jpg

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Auspex

There is no telling how far from its originating stratum the river has carried it.

The columnar end looks to be an internal mold, and the 'cap' end is eroded to its present configuration. Identify the mold and we'll have an answer.

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Joanne0864

Pennsylvania area. Aren't mushrooms a type of mold?

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JohnJ

@Joanne0864 

Do you have any focused photos of the circular end?

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Fossildude19
27 minutes ago, Joanne0864 said:

Pennsylvania area. Aren't mushrooms a type of mold?

They are actually fungus, not mold.

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Joanne0864
45 minutes ago, JohnJ said:

@Joanne0864 

Do you have any focused photos of the circular end?

Once I get back home tomorrow I will get a picture of that end of that fossil. Thanks so much for your help

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Jackson g

Looks like coral to me. Not sure the type but I find cherty chunks of coral like that in my home grounds.

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TqB

I agree it looks like a silicified solitary coral.

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Fossildude19
2 hours ago, Jackson g said:

Looks like coral to me. Not sure the type but I find cherty chunks of coral like that in my home grounds.

Any pictures you could share with us?

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FossilNerd
On 10/8/2019 at 6:37 PM, Auspex said:

There is no telling how far from its originating stratum the river has carried it.

The columnar end looks to be an internal mold, and the 'cap' end is eroded to its present configuration. Identify the mold and we'll have an answer.

 

7 hours ago, Joanne0864 said:

Pennsylvania area. Aren't mushrooms a type of mold?

 

7 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

They are actually fungus, not mold.

 

Just for clarification... Auspex was meaning an internal mold as in an internal cast of something. Not sure why, but an old fashioned ice cube tray comes to mind. The ice would be an internal mold/cast of the compartment in the tray.

 

We are thinking it may be a similar situation here. Except, instead of water filling the hollow inside of something, it was possibly sediment and minerals that later turned to stone via lithification processes. ;):) 

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Jackson g
5 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Any pictures you could share with us?

Of course. The right one is in a tough cherty limestone mix and is solid. Occasionally I come across some like the left example that are not completely solidified inside and display some internal features. I think they are solitary rugosa corals, but I could be wrong.

20191009_204548.jpg

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Fossildude19

Thanks for posting examples! 

Very nice corals! :) 

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Joanne0864

Can anyone tell me who or where I can get the identity confirmed?

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Mark Kmiecik
15 hours ago, Joanne0864 said:

Can anyone tell me who or where I can get the identity confirmed?

Possibly no one can. If the members of this forum are unsure -- and this includes many professional paleontologists -- then the chances are good that not enough of the fossil is there to allow precise identification. "Coral" might be as close as it gets, simply because there are so many different species of coral that are very similar to each other and can only be identified by certain features that are not present on this specimen. I agree with the others that it is most probably a coral. It is definitely not a morel or any other kind of mushroom because of the features it does exhibit, a striated "stem" being one of them. Also the "cap" is completely wrong for a morel and fossil mushrooms are so very extremely rare and 99.99999999% not likely to be found anywhere near the area where you found this. The types of preservation common among fossils of that area would not have been enough to preserve a mushroom and would have turned one into a featureless blob of squished muck.

 

It is a very nice and intriguing specimen. I'm sure not all of the 28,000 members of this forum have seen it yet so someone may yet recognize it. You can take it to the closest natural history museum that has a paleontologist on staff. A hands-on ID is more likely to be accurate than one made from photos of a specimen but I doubt it will be possible in this case.

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howard_l

chert replaced rugose coral, Mississippian in age

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TqB
9 hours ago, howard_l said:

chert replaced rugose coral, Mississippian in age

I agree with silicified rugose coral, but why Mississippian specifically? I don't think there's enough of it to distinguish from other Palaeozoic periods.

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herve

Hello j am sure that is a sea urshin spine break,best regards

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