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blackmoth

fluorescent fish fossil

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Bobby Rico

Disco davidi  :raindance:

cool photos great details .

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Fossildude19

Very cool!

Any chance for a picture in regular lighting for comparison? 

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Nimravis

That is really nice.

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caldigger

Is he using long or short wave?

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blackmoth
3 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Very cool!

Any chance for a picture in regular lighting for comparison? 

bb167260511e5cbcfc01235ca46a4e8.thumb.jpg.035b1e51fc7fed8b286fcb923d94f4c5.jpge3b500d0bc679d252870e3bc385331c.thumb.jpg.39043858a8170316d55536eacc6519e4.jpg

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blackmoth
2 hours ago, caldigger said:

Is he using long or short wave?

i will ask him to see if he knows. 99% chance it is the ordinary uv to check the authenticity of money. 360nm wave length or so. the shorter ones to kill germs, about 280 nm orso, are not safe for such photo taking

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Fossildude19

Thanks for the extra pictures. :) 

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blackmoth
17 hours ago, caldigger said:

Is he using long or short wave?

365 nm wavelength

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FossilDAWG

I wonder if anyone has ever tried collecting there at night with a UV light?  It seems it might make fossils easier to recognize if they light up like that.

 

Don

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Yoda

Beginners question :unsure:

 

I thought UV florescence was a sign of some sort of "doctoring" on a fossil? 

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FossilDAWG

Not necessarily.  Some fossils (such as your fish) are composed of minerals that are naturally fluorescent.  Others (most) are not.  One would have to examine an authentic specimen (or several of them) from a site to determine if fluorescence is a natural attribute.  If it is not (as is the case for Moroccan trilobites, I believe) then the presence of fluorescent patches in a specimen suggests that the chemical composition of those patches is different from the rest of the specimen, which strongly suggests the presence of materials used to reconstruct or replace missing or damaged areas. 

 

Don

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aplomado
2 hours ago, Yoda said:

Beginners question :unsure:

 

I thought UV florescence was a sign of some sort of "doctoring" on a fossil? 

My oreodont teeth glow fluorescent orange!  I was told it has to do with the minerals it uptakes when fossilizing.

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Sjfriend

WOW! The detail difference is amazing! Love how the scales really show up

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t-tree

I am well impressed with the result of the UV light on the fossil fish and i'm now wondering if i would get any sort of a result on my carboniferous scorpion fossil :zzzzscratchchin: i must get hold of a UV light'

 

Cheers John

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FossilNerd
On 10/10/2019 at 9:48 AM, Yoda said:

Beginners question :unsure:

 

I thought UV florescence was a sign of some sort of "doctoring" on a fossil? 

I was under this impression as well. Good to know that it’s not always the case. Very cool detail on these fish! 

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