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barefootgirl

Show Us Your Cut And Polished Nautiloids And Ammonites

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barefootgirl

Okay, I would love to see other peoples Nautiloids and Ammonites that have been cut and polished.

This little nautiloid below is the only thing Ive had cut and polished so far but I'm hoping to get some of the bigger nautiloids and some of the ammonites I found in the woodbine formation cut and polished soon.

Nautilods 003.jpg

Nautilods 004.jpg

Nautilods 005.jpg

Nautilods 006.jpg

Nautilods 007.jpg

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fig rocks

Very cool pieces barefoot! Here's the only one I've got finished so far.

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barefootgirl

Wow that things huge! Wish I could find them down here like that.

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jax

Fig, is that you speaking in the clip? Cool accent :wub:

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fig rocks

Fig, is that you speaking in the clip? Cool accent :wub:

Yup, that's my Chilean accent! :P

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barefootgirl

Very cool pieces barefoot! Here's the only one I've got finished so far.

Did you find that? How long did it take you to prep it?

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CreekCrawler

Here is my entry.

post-417-12573991823503_thumb.jpgpost-417-12573992015985_thumb.jpgpost-417-12573992246154_thumb.jpg

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Bill

very nice as 'ornaments', but I think it such a shame to cut and polish any fossil, apart from one end of a piece of pet' wood, unless they are badly damaged in the first place. Or if necessary for scientific purposes. It turns good specimens into mere ornaments, imo.

Edited by Bill

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Terry Dactyll

barefootgirl....Very nice examples and Im pretty sure that biggest nautilus would come up a treat if it were to be professionally polished... I can see colour in there now.... Heres a couple of mine... 2 nautilus and two ammonites from the lower lias of Scunthorpe and Somerset...

Fig& CreekCrawler.... WOW.....Very Nice....

Bill..... People dont always collect fossils purely from a scientific perspective or percieve their collections to be of any great scientific value..... many museums have polished fossils on display say Scunthorpes for example.... these have been polished from day one to reveal the suture lines and colours.... most Lyme astys you see in museums or for sale have the outer shell removed during prep to reveal the calcite 'cast' infil.... so where do you draw the line........to say every fossils shouldnt be polished is a bit OTT.... id say Scientifically important material that needs to be studied... If .. the person that finds it can recognise this... Its just a hobby at the end of the day........

post-1630-12574177719673_thumb.jpg post-1630-12574177827803_thumb.jpg

post-1630-12574178169997_thumb.jpg post-1630-12574178516669_thumb.jpg

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Bill

Steve, where did I say 'every fossil shouldn't be polished'?

I stated an opinion that I think it's a shame to cut and polish a good specimen. Each to their own though, and I don't condemn anyone for doing so.

I have seen many specimens, in many museums and, in my opinion, they don't look as good as uncut specimens.

BFG shows what look like 3 examples of the same Naut' sp. (especially as having come from the same loc'), and said she is "..hoping to get some of the bigger nautiloids and some of the ammonites I found in the woodbine formation cut and polished soon". I thought, maybe wrongly, that she was referring to all 3.

Why not just cut and polish one?

Adding a little floor wax, or whatever, will enhance the others without destroying them, imo.

Edited by Bill

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Bear

Over on this side of the pond the original locals used crinoid sections for money and ornament. I gotta agree with Steve on that - some specimens are better presented as ornaments. It also helps to popularize the field among non - scientific types. :D

Good pix folks.

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Terry Dactyll

Bill.... I thought the 'very nice as ornaments' statement was a generalisation... stating its a shame to polish everything that isnt damaged.... suggesting it lowers its scientific value 'in your opinion'.... thousands of identical ammonites are found of certain species.... and for this reason.... various processes are carried out on them to make them attractive to collectors at many levels....some people like shiney trinkets others want different species.... I just collect what I collect and enjoy it....

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barefootgirl

barefootgirl....Very nice examples and Im pretty sure that biggest nautilus would come up a treat if it were to be professionally polished... I can see colour in there now.... Heres a couple of mine... 2 nautilus and two ammonites from the lower lias of Scunthorpe and Somerset...

Fig& CreekCrawler.... WOW.....Very Nice....

Bill..... People dont always collect fossils purely from a scientific perspective or percieve their collections to be of any great scientific value..... many museums have polished fossils on display say Scunthorpes for example.... these have been polished from day one to reveal the suture lines and colours.... most Lyme astys you see in museums or for sale have the outer shell removed during prep to reveal the calcite 'cast' infil.... so where do you draw the line........to say every fossils shouldnt be polished is a bit OTT.... id say Scientifically important material that needs to be studied... If .. the person that finds it can recognise this... Its just a hobby at the end of the day........

post-1630-12574177719673_thumb.jpg post-1630-12574177827803_thumb.jpg

post-1630-12574178169997_thumb.jpg post-1630-12574178516669_thumb.jpg

I just fell in love!! That nautiloid is superb, yet another reason I need to hop the pond and go hunting over there one day. Thank you for sharing.

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barefootgirl

Here is my entry.

post-417-12573991823503_thumb.jpgpost-417-12573992015985_thumb.jpgpost-417-12573992246154_thumb.jpg

Yep, I defiantly need to come borrow some of your collection.:D

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fig rocks

Did you find that? How long did it take you to prep it?

A friend of mine found this one and had it prepared by Korite. I purchased it from him. This is the one that sparked my interest in ammonites and started my passion for collecting them. :wub:

creekcrawler and Steve... Wow, beautiful! :wub:

Bill... That's what's done to the specimens up here because they're covered with a precious gem material and to bring out their full beauty and value they have to be prepped. If you didn't it would be like collecting precious stones and never getting them cut or faceted, you'd never see them in their finished splendor or get the full worth out of them! :)

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Bill

I did not mean that as criticism. My original post could have been worded better. I do think they make nice ornaments, as I said.

The naut's in the first post look, again imo, too good to cut. A gentle polish of the outside, without removing the whole outer shell would, imo, be better. Most polished ammo's, naut's, large oysters, etc, which have been polished to the degree of removing the outer shell, do look good. I just prefer to see the original specimen.

EDIT, As for cutting them, 1 example would be fine, but preferably of a damaged specimen.

Edited by Bill

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barefootgirl

I did not mean that as criticism. My original post could have been worded better. I do think they make nice ornaments, as I said.

The naut's in the first post look, again imo, too good to cut. A gentle polish of the outside, without removing the whole outer shell would, imo, be better. Most polished ammo's, naut's, large oysters, etc, which have been polished to the degree of removing the outer shell, do look good. I just prefer to see the original specimen.

EDIT, As for cutting them, 1 example would be fine, but preferably of a damaged specimen.

I appreciate your opinion and thank you for expressing concern for my nautiloids and ammonites. What you cant see in those photos is that all of the nautiloids are damaged. Ive been looking at them for a while now and I think I would prefer them cut, plus I know the middle one is gonna be really sweet looking inside.

As for my ammonites I have plenty and don't intend to have them all cut open but I hear the ammonites from the woodbine formation can be really nice inside. One of the reasons I started this post was to see what other peoples experiences were with sliced and polished ammonites. I am really hoping to see some from Texas that have been cut and polished, although any are fine.

Thanks again for your opinion.

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JohnJ

I can see what you're saying, Bill. I have to agree with you about cutting "common" damaged ones as the preferable choice. Yet, as others have said, I also don't see a lot of harm in the cut & polish of very common, undamaged ones. Besides, it's fun being misinterpreted....

BFG, if it was me, I wouldn't cut the nautiloid in the shown in pic #3, #4, & #5. That appears to be a nice specimen, even with some damage. Our Texas contingent can correct me, but it seems larger nautiloids are harder to find in our state. However, if you have 30 more just like it, then send me the damaged half. ;)

Edited by JohnJ

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Bill

.... I also don't see a lot of harm in the cut & polish of very common, undamaged ones. Besides, it's fun being misinterpreted....

BFG, if it was me, I wouldn't cut the nautiloid in the shown in pic #3, #4, & #5. That appears to be a nice specimen,

Thankyou BFG. :)

That is one of the points I was trying to make John. I can only go by my experience of British finds, and to me, naut's of that size are not 'very common'. Hence my post.

Also, I thought it was 3 different specimens in BFG's post.

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Terry Dactyll

Im being missinterpreted now...lol..... I said polish the 'outside' of the big nautilus..not cut it in half..... Thats what I would choose to do... the external shell has already gone showing the sutures..... it would look stunning polished and not requite to much work to do....I would love to see what colour it turns out, I can already see different colours in the seperate chambers as different minerals have crept in there..... ;)

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CreekCrawler

I can see what you're saying, Bill. I have to agree with you about cutting "common" damaged ones as the preferable choice. Yet, as others have said, I also don't see a lot of harm in the cut & polish of very common, undamaged ones. Besides, it's fun being misinterpreted....

BFG, if it was me, I wouldn't cut the nautiloid in the shown in pic #3, #4, & #5. That appears to be a nice specimen, even with some damage. Our Texas contingent can correct me, but it seems larger nautiloids are harder to find in our state. However, if you have 30 more just like it, then send me the damaged half. ;)

Nautiloids are not common at all around these parts.Ammonites however are. I personally enjoy Nautiloids more than Ammonites due to their rarity and appearance. I have found one complete Nautiloid in my many ventures afield.It's about the size of a Half Dollar,so Tera's find is an exceptional one for shure.

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Auspex

All I know is that the People for the Ethical Treatment of Ammonites picketed me until I stopped using the things for skeet practice... :P

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JohnJ

All I know is that the People for the Ethical Treatment of Ammonites picketed me until I stopped using the things for skeet practice... :P

I hear they are still bothering the Disc Golf Association.

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barefootgirl

I guess I need to stop giving my nautiloids away. Im only going to get the mid sized one cut and polished, the big one will be left like it is.

thanks everyone for your input.

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barefootgirl

I can see what you're saying, Bill. I have to agree with you about cutting "common" damaged ones as the preferable choice. Yet, as others have said, I also don't see a lot of harm in the cut & polish of very common, undamaged ones. Besides, it's fun being misinterpreted....

BFG, if it was me, I wouldn't cut the nautiloid in the shown in pic #3, #4, & #5. That appears to be a nice specimen, even with some damage. Our Texas contingent can correct me, but it seems larger nautiloids are harder to find in our state. However, if you have 30 more just like it, then send me the damaged half. ;)

Those are actually 2 different nautiloids the one with the quarter on it is the biggest one I have so far. I would send you one but Im down to owning only 4 now since my family have all wanted one and ive given a few away for trades in the past. In all my searching around this place and others my creek is the only place I have ever found those. I have found some small qurter sized ones in the sulphur but they were just black phosphate ones.

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